tech e blog

Paris, France

Photo credit: Bertrand Monney

Paris-based filmmaker Mayeul Akpovi has been all around France and rather than film random events, he decided to create stunning hyperlapse videos of cities like Besancon, Rouen, and lots more. Above, we have his most recent Paris in Motion video. In the 12th century, Paris was the largest city in the western world, a prosperous trading center, the home of the University of Paris, one of the most influential centers of learning in Europe; and the birthplace of the style that later became known as Gothic architecture. In the eighteenth century, it was the center stage for many important events in French history, including the Enlightenment and the French Revolution, and an important center of commerce, fashion, science, and the arts, a position it still holds today. Continue reading for more.

5. Paris

Paris is the home of the Louvre, the most visited art museum in the world, with outstanding collections of European and ancient art; the Musee d'Orsay, devoted to 19th century French art, including the works of the French impressionists; the Centre Georges Pompidou, a museum of international modern art, and the Musee du quai Branly, a new museum devoted to the arts and cultures of the Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania; and many other notable art museums and galleries.


4. Besancon

Besancon is the capital and principal city of the Franche-Comte region in eastern France. It had a population of about 237,000 inhabitants in the metropolitan area in 2008. Located close to the border with Switzerland, it is the capital of the department of Doubs. Once proclaimed first green city of France, it has been labeled a 'Town of Art and History' since 1986. Since 2008, Besancon's Vauban citadel has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.


3. Rouen

Rouen, in north-western France on the River Seine, is the capital of the Haute-Normandie region and the historic capital city of Normandy. One of the largest and most prosperous cities of medieval Europe, it was the seat of the Exchequer of Normandy in the Middle Ages. It was one of the capitals of the Anglo-Norman dynasties, which ruled both England and large parts of modern France from the 11th to the 15th centuries. It was here that Joan of Arc was executed in 1431. People from Rouen are called Rouennais. The population of the metropolitan area at the 1999 census was 518,316, and 532,559 at the 2007 estimate. The city proper had an estimated population of 110,276 in 2007.


2. Marseille

Marseille is the second largest city in France, after Paris, with a population of 850,636 (January 2011) within its administrative limits on a land area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi). It is the 3rd-largest metropolitan area in France after Paris and Lyon, with a population of 1,720,941 at the January 2011 census. Marseille was historically the most important trade center in the region and functioned as the main trade port of the French Empire. Marseille is France's largest city on the Mediterranean coast and largest commercial port. Marseille is the capital of the Provence-Alpes-Cpte d'Azur region, as well as the capital of the Bouches-du-Rhone department. Its inhabitants are called Marseillais in French and Marselhes in Occitan.


1. Lyon

Lyon is a city in east-central France, in the Rhpne-Alpes region, situated between Paris and Marseille. Lyon is located approximately 470 kilometres (292 miles) from Paris, 320 km (199 mi) from Marseille, 420 km (261 mi) from Strasbourg, 160 km (99 mi) from Geneva, 280 km (174 mi) from Turin. The residents of the city are called Lyonnais. It has a significant role in the history of cinema due to Auguste and Louis Lumiere, who invented the cinematographe in Lyon. The city is also known for its famous light festival 'Fete des Lumieres' which occurs every 8 December and lasts for four days, earning Lyon the title of Capital of Lights.









This entry was posted on 08/23 8:00pm and is filed under Feature, Photography, Top 5, Travel .
You can leave a response.

Interesting Posts Around the Web