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Yes, we've featured these photographs before, but now we have first-hand information from the photographer as well as a video. These were all photographed by Suren Manvelyan, a 36-year-old physics teacher who used his friends, colleagues and pupils as models. Continue reading to see them all.

7. Depth

Thin circular structures, our irises are responsible not only for giving our eyes their color, but also controlling the diameter pupils to determine how much light reaches the retina.

6. Stroma

Mr Manvelyan's pictures show the front pigmented fibrovascular tissue known as a stroma. Beneath that lies pigmented epithelial cells, with the whole structure connected to muscles which control the size of the aperture of the pupil.

5. Colors

Said to be the windows of the soul, the eyes gain much of their character from the unique structure of each person's iris. The term is derived from the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, due to the many colors they can have. In humans irises have been known to be green, blue, brown, and in rarer cases, hazel, grey, violet, or even pink.

4. Iris

The iris is divided into two major regions: The pupillary zone is the inner region whose edge forms the boundary of the pupil. The ciliary zone is the rest of the iris that extends to its origin at the ciliary body.

3. Spherical

The iris is divided into two major regions. The pupillary zone is the inner region whose edge forms the boundary of the pupil. The ciliary zone is the rest of the iris that extends to its origin at the ciliary body.

2. Piercing

The work is literally eye-catching, but Mr Manvelyan, who started experimenting with photography when he was 16 and is now a leading photographer for Yerevan Magazine, is reluctant to share his technique. 'The process of taking these pictures is my secret,' he says.

1. Green Blue

The color of green eyes does not result simply from the pigmentation of the iris. Rather, its appearance is caused by the combination of an amber or light brown pigmentation of the stroma, given by a low or moderate concentration of melanin, with the blue tone imparted by the Rayleigh scattering of the reflected light.

Bonus Video



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This entry was posted on 12/13/2012 02:30am and is filed under Photography, Science .
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