tech e blog

3D-Printed Heart

Researchers from Swiss technology institute ETH Zurich have 3D-printed an artificial heart that could one day become a transplant for patients in need. It was made from silicon using a 3D printer, and looks as well as functions just like a real human heart. The 390 gram heart has a left and right ventricle separated by an additional chamber inflated and deflated with air pressure, similar to the pump action of the human heart. "This was simply a feasibility test. Our goal was not to present a heart ready for implantation, but to think about a new direction for the development of artificial hearts," said researcher Nicholas Cohrs. Click here for the first picture in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of NASA's mind-blowing New Horizons flyover of Pluto.

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3D-Printed Honda Motorcycle

New York-based artist Jonathan Brand has always wanted a 1972 Honda CB500, but instead of scouring the classifieds, he used open source Ultimaker 3D printers to create a replica of the motorbike from PLA plastic. In other words, each individual component of the bike was modeled in a 3D program before they were printed. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Paul Kohlhaussen, a Richmond student, decided to create a fully-functional 3D-printed camera, when he realized his dream cameras were way out of his budget. Even more impressive is the fact that he had no prior knowledge in CAD software, and managed to teach himself everything from scratch. This custom-built creation combines the features of the Mamiya 7 (medium format photography), Hasselblad XPan (panoramas), and last, but not least, the Leica M Series. What he ended up with, is the "Cycloptic Mustard Monster," which is designed to shoot 6 x 14 negatives on 120 film, and features an 8-part modular design that easily pairs with camera gear. Continue reading for some sample shots and more information.

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Solar 3D Printer

MIT researchers have just created a solar-powered robot that can 3D print the entire basic structure of a building using on-site materials. A user could customize the structure any way they see fit, thanks to a vehicle with one large robotic arm with a second smaller and more precise arm at the end. The vehicle also comes equipped with a scoop, so that it can help prepare the building area and pick up building materials on its own. They recently showcased the technology by building a 12-foot high, 50-foot wide dome out of foam-insulation framework, in just 14-hours. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny demotivational posters gallery. Continue reading for a viral video showing what happens when you shoot a glass Prince Rupert's Drop at point blank range with a high-powered gun.

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3D-Printed Armor

Photo credit: Lume Cluster via Bored Panda

Self-taught artist Melissa Ng unveils her latest project, "Sovereign Armor," which took over 518-hours to complete, and that's without the 3D-printing process. Weighing in at 8-pounds and equipped with glowing LEDs, the intricate patterns you see "are meant to look like rolling waves while the fluting is meant to look like ripples," said the artist. The glow was designed to "give the impression of magical and ethereal energy and symbolize the light of the creative," adds Ng. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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3D-Printed Grenade Launcher

Created by the U.S. Armament Research Development and Engineering Center (RDECOM), this 3D-printed grenade launcher, called "RAMBO" (Rapid Additively Manufactured Ballistics Ordnance), is functional and made from aluminum using a proprietary direct metal laser sintering process. It took the team approximately 6-months to design and manufacture this weapon, with 3D-printed ammunition thrown in. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of an impressive size comparison of the universe.

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3D-Printed Residential House

Photo credit: Bored Panda

San Francisco-based Apis Cor specializes in 3D-printing, and decided to test their new mobile 3D-printer by printing an entire 400-square-foot home in just 24-hours. How much did all of this cost, excluding the printer? Just $10,134 USD, or far less than any traditional home. Despite requiring just one day to print a home from a concrete mixture, the structures are claimed to last up to 175-years. Continue reading for another video, more pictures and information.

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3D-Printed Solar System

London-based artist George Ioannidis grew up watching shows like Carl Sagan's Cosmos, so it's only fitting that he found a company called "Little Planet Factory". Thanks to 3D printers costing less than many smartphones, this technology was used to manufacture a host of miniature planets, moons, and suns that are small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. Planets range from 2.5-inches in size, and can be printed in sizes up to 7.8-inches in diameter for added detail. You can even order the entire solar system in a tiny bottle. Continue reading for another video, more pictures and information. Click here for a few bonus images.

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Bee 3D Printer

Whiskey maker Dewar enlisted the services of 80,000 honey bees to naturally 3D print a bottle from honeycomb, and are calling it the "3B project." To be more specific, the project involves the bees and custom-built plastic molds in which they form their honeycomb. Once the bees finish their work, the molds are opened, revealing a fully-formed shape. They also tried to "print" a sculpture of a man using the bees as well. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of a dropping toothpaste into a hot pan experiment.

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Batman Arkham Knight Helmet

A video posted by BURT (@project_burt) on

Project Props went above and beyond to create a 3D-printed Batman: Arkham Knight helmet. The design was taken directly from the game's source code, and even then, it required several days of work to transform that file into something workable. For example, the team had to move the eye holes so the wearer could actually see out the mask. Next, they added functional LED lights to complete the futuristic look. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of an awesome literal Bohemian Rhapsody, with tons of computer-generated effects.

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