tech e blog

Volkswagen Schimwwagen

Before modern amphibious cars, like the WaterCar Panther, there was Volkswagen's Type 166 Schwimmwagen, used extensively in World War II. It's essentially a four wheel drive vehicle on first gear - reverse gears with some models - that has ZF self-locking differentials on both front and rear axles. Similar to the Kubelwagen, the Schwimmwagen had portal gear rear hubs that gave better ground clearance, while at the same time reducing drive-line torque stresses with their gear reduction at the wheels. Continue reading for two videos and more information.

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100-Year-Old Life Hacks

There are modern life hacks, and then these century-old tips from Gallaher's Cigarettes. During the early 1900s, many cigarette manufactures included stiffening cards into their paper cigarette packs to reinforce the packaging. Gallaher's didn't want to waste paper on these cards, so the company decided to print trivia, artwork and even well-known people onto them - including the famous Honus Wagner. The entire 100 card collection can be viewed at the New York Public Library's George Arents Collection. Continue reading for more.

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Famous Photo Colorized

Thanks to a dedicated photographers and designers, many historical photographs have been given new life with a variety of colorization techniques. Despite all the technology available, many preview the manual method of adding color to a black-and-white photograph using watercolors, oils, crayons or pastels, and other paints or dyes. The toughest manual method? Using crayons or pastel sticks of ground pigments since it requires knowledge of drawing techniques. Continue reading for more.

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Sword of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian

Photo credit: Calculuslight / Reddit

Elected King of the Romans February 16, 1486 in Frankfurt-am-Main at his father's initiative and crowned on April 9, 1486 in Aachen, Maximilian I stood at the head of the Holy Roman Empire upon his father's death in 1493. During his first year as an Emperor, much of Austria was under Hungarian rule as they had occupied the territory under the reign of Frederick. In 1490, Maximilian finally reconquered it and entered Vienna. The photos above provide a rare look at one of his swords. Continue reading for more interesting photos.

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Autochrome Portrait

Mervyn O'Gorman, an electrical engineer, captured these beautiful photos of his daughter Christina at Lulworth Cove in Dorset, England over 100-years-ago. These century-old photos from 1913 depict her wearing vivid red clothes, with the saturated hues standing out in sharp contrast to the muted tones of the background, using a process called Autochrome Lumiere process. This technique involved using glass plates coated in potato starches to filter pictures with dye. Continue reading for a video, more pictures and information.

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Retro Game Collection

There are specialty stores that may carry old classics, but for the ultimate in retro games, look no further than this collection, which fills an entire room. As you can see, there's everything from the original R.O.B. to a tower of limited edition N64 consoles. If you look closely, you'll also spot the stacks of Game Boys and also Nintendo's original Famicom. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading to watch the five most popular viral videos of today, including something you'd never expect to see in Brussels, Belgium.

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QWERTY Keyboard History

QWERTY keyboards are used everyday, but have you ever wondered how the layout came to be? If so, it was devised and created in the early 1870s by Christopher Latham Sholes, a newspaper editor and printer who lived in Milwaukee. In October 1867, Sholes filed a patent application for his early writing machine he developed with the assistance of his friends Carlos Glidden and Samuel W. Soule. The QWERTY layout became popular with the success of the Remington No. 2 of 1878, the first typewriter to include both upper and lower case letters, via a shift key. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos of today, including some awesome waffle iron hacks.

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Pontiac Ghost Car

Here's a fascinating look at the 1939 Pontiac Deluxe Six Ghost Car, created in collaboration with chemical company Rohm & Haas, who had just developed a new product called "Plexiglas." To promote this new material, its entire shell was made with the transparent acrylic material. It made its official debut at the 1939-40 New York World's Fair at General Motors' "Highways and Horizons" pavilion. Continue reading for a video, more pictures and additional information.

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Behind the Scenes Star Wars

Photo credit: Peter Mayhew

Peter Mayhew, best known as the 7' 3" actor who played Chewbacca in the Star Wars films decided to share rare behind-the-scenes images of the cast and crew. They give us a fascinating glimpse into the creative process behind one of the most iconic film series of all time. Did you know that Chewbacca was actually inspired by George Lucas' big, hairy Alaskan malamute, Indian? That's right, the dog would always sit in the passenger seat of his car like a copilot, and people mistook it for a real person. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading to watch the five most popular viral videos of today, including of someone using a drone in the most unexpected way.

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Albert Einstein Office After Death

Photo credit: Ralph Morse - Time & Life Pictures / Getty Image

This isn't some random office from the 1950s, but rather Albert Einstein's office, exactly as the Nobel Prize-winning physicist left it, a few hours after he passed in April 1955. The photographer who captured the images above, Roger Morse, says: "Einstein died at the Princeton Hospital...so I headed there first. But it was chaos - journalists, photographers, onlookers. So I headed over to Einstein's office at the Institute for Advanced Studies. On the way, I stopped and bought a case of scotch. I knew people might be reluctant to talk, but most people are happy to accept a bottle of booze, instead of money, in exchange for their help. So I get to the building, find the superintendent, give him a fifth of scotch and like that, he opens up the office." Continue reading for more.

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