tech e blog

What you're looking at above is an amazing photo of Little Italy, a neighborhood in lower Manhattan, New York City, in 1900. In 1910 Little Italy had almost 10,000 Italians; that was the peak of the community's Italian population. At the turn of the 20th century over 90% of the residents of the Fourteenth Ward were of Italian birth or origins. In 2010, Little Italy and Chinatown were listed in a single historic district on the National Register of Historic Places. As of 2014, Little Italy is on the verge of extinction. Continue reading for more.

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No, this isn't a clever green screen illusion, just the Tower Of London surrounded by a 888,246 red ceramic poppies in a flowing sea around the historical structure. This installation was created by artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper, commemorating each and every British or Colonial fatality from World War 1 by planting. Continue reading for more pictures and additional information.

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Douglas Engelbart at the Stanford Research Institute invented the first mouse prototype in the 1960s with the assistance of his lead engineer Bill English. They christened the device the mouse as early models had a cord attached to the rear part of the device looking like a tail and generally resembling the common mouse. Engelbart never received any royalties for it, as his employer SRI held the patent, which ran out before it became widely used in personal computers. The invention of the mouse was just a small part of Engelbart's much larger project, aimed at augmenting human intellect via the Augmentation Research Center. Continue reading for more.

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At the height of Sparta's power - between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE - it was commonly accepted that, "one Spartan was worth several men of any other state." A Spartan man's involvement with the army began in infancy when he was inspected by the Gerousia. If the baby was found to be weak, he was left at Mount Taygetus to die. Those deemed strong were then put in the agoge at the age of seven. Under the agoge the young boys or Spartiates were kept under intense and rigorous military training. Their education focused primarily on sports and war tactics, but also included poetry, music, academics, and sometimes politics. Those who passed the agoge by the age of 30 were given full Spartan citizenship. Continue reading for more.

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Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first humans on the Moon, Americans Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, on July 20, 1969, at 20:18 UTC. Armstrong became the first to step onto the lunar surface six hours later on July 21 at 02:56 UTC. Armstrong spent about two and a half hours outside the spacecraft, Aldrin slightly less, and together they collected 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar material for return to Earth. Click here to view the first image in this week's WINS gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a Star Trek fan's $500,000 memorabilia collection.

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The first patented roller skate was introduced in 1760 by Belgian inventor John Joseph Merlin. His roller skate wasn't much more than an ice skate with wheels where the blade goes, (a style we would call inlines today). They were hard to steer and hard to stop because they didn't have brakes, as such were not very popular. The initial "test pilot" of the first prototype of the skate was in the city of Huy, which had a party with Merlin playing the violin. These motorized versions from 1961 are another story. Continue reading for more bizarre inventions and gadgets from the past.

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Another week, another round of fascinating photos that you probably haven't seen before. This batch includes a samurai helmet belonging to the Mitsudaina family from 1730, a comparison between old vs. new Mercedes-Benz F1 steering wheels, a breathtaking aeriel view of the Grand Canyon at 35,000 feet, and the futuristic interior of the Bloodhound SSC, which is set to go supersonic by hitting speeds in excess of 1,000mph. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a 2-year-old amputee that will restore your faith in humanity.

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Photo credit: Bored Panda

Recreating childhood photos has become the next big thing online, and some of these people decided to take this trend to the next level by going to the same exact location and wearing the same clothes as before.We've got the two brothers eating pizza, father & son, and an entire family performing acrobatic moves. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of 9 ways to pass time at an airport.

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US Navy captain Mark D. Anderson and historian Jean Muller stumbled upon something unexpected when trying to recover artifacts from The Battle of the Bulge in a Luxembourg mountainside. Their metal detector lead them to foxhole that was dug during the battle, and inside, it contained the belongings of an American soldier, Technician Fifth Grade Louis J. Archambeau. There was one item that stood out, a camera with an undeveloped roll of film in it. Continue reading to see the images they found.

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Sometimes, it's good to take a journey back in time to really appreciate all the things we have now, like high-resolution televisions, laptops, smartphones, tablets, etc. This little boy was photographed in awe as he stood watching television for the first time through an appliance store window in 1948. Continue reading for more amazing photos from the past that you might not have seen before.

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