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After leaving Southampton on 10 April 1912, Titanic called at Cherbourg in France and Queenstown (now Cobh) in Ireland before heading westwards towards New York.[2] On 14 April 1912, four days into the crossing and about 375 miles (600 km) south of Newfoundland, she hit an iceberg at 11:40 pm ship's time. Just under two hours after Titanic foundered, the Cunard liner RMS Carpathia arrived on the scene of the sinking, where she brought aboard an estimated 705 survivors. Continue reading for more.

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The original Walkman introduced a change in music listening habits by allowing people to carry music with them and listen to music through lightweight headphones. The prototype was built in 1978 by audio-division engineer Nobutoshi Kihara for Sony co-chairman Akio Morita, who wanted to be able to listen to operas during his frequent trans-Pacific plane trips. Continue reading to see what happened when The Fine Bros gave a group of kids a Walkman and asked them to explain what it does.

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Ever wonder what happens to old war equipment left laying around in the forest around young plants and trees? Well, let's just that eventually everything becomes one again. According to Bored Panda, "the majority of the gear represents Russian arms used during WW2, although there are German weapons as well - the area was the staging ground of an important part of the German army's terrible Siege of Leningrad. 260,000 Soviet troops died trying to reopen land communications with the besieged city of Leningrad, and 160,000 German soldiers died resisting them." Click here to view the first image in this week's funny work pictures gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a Southwest Airlines flight attendant who really should become a comedian instead.

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By 1857, the New York City police department had a gallery where daguerreotypes of criminals were displayed. The Pinkerton National Detective Agency began using these on wanted posters in the United States. By the 1870s the agency had amassed the largest collection of mug shots in the U.S. In 1888, Alphonse Bertillon invented the modern mug shot featuring full face and profile views, standardizing the lighting and angles. This system was soon adopted throughout Europe, and in the United States and Russia. These examples from the 1920s may even appear as photos from a party or gathering to some, but they're actually real police mug shots. Continue reading for more.

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Did you know that Albert Einstein refused surgery during his last days? That's right, he felt that surgery would prolong his life artificially, and that he'd rather go elegantly, since he's done his share. Einstein published more than 300 scientific papers along with over 150 non-scientific works. His great intellectual achievements and originality have made the word "Einstein" synonymous with genius. Continue reading for more.

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Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid

2014 marks the 100th anniversary of World War One, and photographer Peter Macdiarmid decided to pay tribute with a fascinating, yet haunting collection, of photo montages that splices together war-torn Europe with the exact same locations as seen today. Click here to view the first image in this week's geek life gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of the ultimate monster truck smash FAIL.

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Photo credit: media Files

Love historical photos? Here are 10 more to whet your appetite. In one of the images, you'll see how New York City looked in 1865. This bustling city provided a major source of troops, supplies, equipment and financing for the Union Army. The port of New York, a major entry point for immigrants, served as recruiting grounds for the Army. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video titled "Unsung Hero", a heartwarming short film.

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Back in the early days of computers, getting word out about a new product was much harder than simply clicking a few buttons. This lead to a plethora of magazine ads, and to stand out, some companies went the extra mile to hire professional models, but not all of them turned out as planned. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of an alternate opening scene for the movie "Gravity".

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Apollo 1 was the first manned mission of the U.S. Apollo manned lunar landing program. Unfortunately, the planned low Earth orbital test of the Apollo Command/Service Module, never made its target launch date of February 21, 1967, because a cabin fire during a launch rehearsal test on January 27 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 34 killed all three crew members. Continue reading for more rare historical photos you might not have seen before.

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In 1943, Richard James, a naval mechanical engineer stationed at the William Cramp and Sons shipyards in Philadelphia, was developing springs that could support and stabilize sensitive instruments aboard ships in rough seas. James accidentally knocked one of the springs from a shelf, and watched as the spring "stepped" in a series of arcs to a stack of books, to a tabletop, and to the floor, where it re-coiled itself and stood upright. His wife Betty dubbed the toy Slinky (meaning "sleek and graceful"), after finding the word in a dictionary, and deciding that the word aptly described the sound of a metal spring expanding and collapsing. Continue reading for more.

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