tech e blog

1912 Henderson Motorcycle

Henderson was a manufacturer of 4-cylinder motorcycles from 1912 until 1931. They were the largest and fastest motorcycles of their time, and appealed to sport riders and police departments. The company promptly announced a new 57 cubic inch (934 cc) IOE four-cylinder 7 hp motorcycle, with the engine mounted inline with the frame and chain drive. Production began in 1911, using the in-line four-cylinder engine and long wheelbase that would become Henderson trademarks, and it was available to the public in January 1912. Advertisements boasted 7 HP and a price of $325. It was the third four-cylinder production motorcycle built in the United States, and featured a folding hand-crank starter handle. Continue reading for 18 more fascinating pictures from around the web.

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Oldsmobile Aerotech

The Oldsmobile Aerotechs are essentially experimental high-speed vehicles created between 1987-1992 that incorporated the latest in performance technology with the intention of breaking multiple automobile speed records. The first such car was driven by four-time Indy 500 winner A.J. Foyt to a world closed-course speed record of 257.123 mph on August 27, 1987 at the 7.712-mile test track near Fort Stockton Texas. Prior to this, on August 26, 1987, the car had posted a top speed over a mile of 267.88 mph. The vehicle basically consisted of a March Indycar single seat chassis enclosed in an extremely efficient aerodynamic body shell, powered by a highly turbo-charged version of the 2-litre Oldsmobile Quad 4 engine. Click here to view the first image in this week's geek life gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a trucker who flying kicked a thief off his motorbike.

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Lucas Death Star

Although details, such as the superlaser's location, shifted between different concept models during production of Star Wars, the notion of the Death Star being a large, spherical space station over 100 kilometers in diameter was consistent in all of them. The Death Star model was created by John Stears. In the image above, George Lucas himself inspected the incomplete Death Star model, which was a mirror image of how it appeared in the finished movie. It's one of the few models that never leaves the Archives because it is too fragile. Continue reading for more rare behind-the-scenes images from famous movies. Click here for a few bonus images.

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Photo Citizen Kane (1941)Photo The Great Escape (1963)Photo Blade Runner (1982)Photo Gladiator (2000)Photo Raging Bull (1980)Photo It's a Wonderful Life (1946)Photo The Misfits (1961)Photo Aliens (1986)Photo Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)Photo The Graduate (1967)Photo Edward Scissorhands (1990)Photo The Exorcist (1973)Photo The Godfather Part II (1974)Photo A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)Photo The Seven Year Itch (1955)Photo Apocalypse Now (1979)


Big Wind Firefighting Tank

Here's a blast from the past in the form of a firefighting tank. You read that right, a Hungarian company strapped two MiG engines onto a Soviet tank to blow out the worst sort of raging oil-well fires. When the water is turned on, the six nozzles above the powerful turbine engines unleash an immense blast of water that mingles with the jet exhaust to become a ferocious spray of steam. The water moves at a maximum rate of 220-gallons of water a second. The fire is extinguished by severing the supply of oil to the flame. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one showing how to make your own mini RPG launcher at home.

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One Wheel Monowheel

A monowheel is basically a one-wheeled single-track vehicle similar to a unicycle. However, instead of sitting above the wheel, the rider sits either within it or next to it. The wheel is a ring, usually driven by smaller wheels pressing against its inner rim. Hand-cranked and pedal-powered monowheels were patented and built in the late 19th century; most built in the 20th century have been motorized. Some modern builders refer to these vehicles as monocycles, though that term is also sometimes used to describe motorized unicycles. Continue reading for more amazing colorized historical photos. Click here for a few bonus images.

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Photo Painting Propaganda c.1942Photo Heat Wave in New York c.1912Photo Lunch Time c.1908Photo Manhattan at Sunset c.1936Photo Beach Day c.1900Photo Metal Workers c.1940


Best Buy Black Friday

Remember when a 33.6K modem could be picked up for $9.99, or a 200MHz AMD K6 computer package for $999.99? If not, this Black Friday Best Buy ad from 1999 should refresh your memory. Back then, the lines were even longer, since online shopping wasn't as prevalent yet, which meant local news stations lining right up with the customers to catch all of the madness on video. Continue reading for more fascinating images from around the web.

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Original Tomorrowland

The original Tomorrowland debuted at Disneyland on July 17, 1955, with only several of its planned attractions open, due to budget cuts. The construction of the park was rushed, so this themed area was the last to be finished, and became something of a corporate showcase, despite Walt Disney's reluctance. Monsanto Company, American Motors, Richfield Oil, and Dutch Boy Paint were some of the many companies to open showcases in Tomorrowland in the first few years. One cost-cutting idea was to reuse the sets of the Nautilus from Disney's 1954 movie 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea as a walkthrough attraction. This remained open until 1966. Continue reading for more rare pictures of Disneyland's opening day in 1955. Click here for a few bonus "then and now" images.

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Bertone Ramarro

Based on Chevrolet's 1984 C4 Corvette, the Bertone Ramarro, which means "green lizard" in Italian, modified the car's original mechanical component layout. The radiator and air-conditioning were moved to the rear, while the doors opened by sliding forwards. The entirely glazed greenhouse was the final design touch, and the interior was finished in leather resembling lizard skin. What really set this concept apart from the C4 was that rather than a stick, the driver changed gears by a switch on the dial. Continue reading for another video, more pictures and additional information. Click here to view a few bonus images.

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Chernobyl Elephant's Foot

The Chernobyl Disaster was a nuclear catastrophe that occurred on April 26, 1986 in the No.4 Light water graphite moderated reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the city of Pripyat. After six months of investigation, in December 1986, they discovered, with the help of a remote camera, an intensely radioactive mass in the basement of Unit Four. Measuring more than 2-meters wide and weighing hundreds of tons, they called it "the elephant's foot" for its wrinkled appearance. The mass was composed of sand, glass and a large amount of nuclear fuel that had escaped from the reactor. The concrete beneath the reactor was steaming hot, and was breached by solidified lava and spectacular unknown crystalline forms termed chernobylite. Continue reading for five more things you may not know about the Chernobyl Disaster. Click here for a few bonus images.

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Osborne 1 First Laptop

Released in 1981, the Osborne 1 was touted as the first mass-produced, microprocessor-based portable computer, running the CP/M operating system. Despite being noticeably bulkier compared to today's laptops, with a tiny 5" CRT monitor, it had a near-revolutionary impact on business professionals, as they were able to take their computer and data with them just about anywhere. This, along with a few other "luggables" were inspired by what was probably the first portable computer, the Xerox NoteTaker. Size wise, the computer could be compared to a portable sewing machine, just portable enough to be carried onto commercial aircraft. Continue reading for eighteen more interesting pictures from around the web.

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