tech e blog

Lotec Sirius

Lotec is basically a German sports car manufacturer that was founded in 1962 by Kurt Lotterschmid. In 1983, they began to create aftermarket aerodynamic and performance parts for Mercedes-Benz cars. Fast forward to 2004, and the Lotec Sirius was introduced, powered by a Pagani Zonda C12S-sourced, twin-turbocharged V12. The company claims that the car will produce 1000hp, or up to 1200hp when tuned. Continue reading for a video of its incredible engine and more information.

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Amphibious Lamborghini

The Lamborghini Countach is a legendary supercar in its own right, but for those who prefer extreme vehicles, this amphibious version should do the trick. It's registered in England as a Ryan Rover V8 Sports, and sits atop a multi tube semi-space frame, with a composite body molded from a Countach 5000QV. Other specifications include: fully adjustable AVO gas coil-overs with push-rod suspension, vented discs brakes, and a leather dash. Continue reading for more interesting images from around the web.

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Nintendo M82

The Nintendo M82 was a essentially a demon unit for stores that allowed customers to try several games before purchasing them. Officially called the "M82 Game Selectable Working Product Display," it could hold 12 game cartridges, and can be selected by pressing buttons next to the desired title. The play time could also be set: 30-seconds, 3-minutes, 6-minutes or 128 minutes. Continue reading for more fascinating historical photos.

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Eiffel Tower Construction

Photo credit: Dynamichrome via PetaPixel

The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower, constructed in 1889 as the entrance to the 1889 World's Fairon, on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It's named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. During its construction, the Eiffel Tower surpassed the Washington Monument to become the tallest man-made structure in the world, a title it held for 41 years until the Chrysler Building in New York City was built in 1930. The image you see above is from 1888 during its construction. Continue reading for more amazing colorized vintage photos.

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Graflex Big Bertha

H/T: PetaPixel | Photo credit: Geoffrey Berliner / Penumbra Foundation

Before fancy DSLRs, sports photographers used the Graflex "Big Bertha" to capture action shots at events. This massive 120-pound camera snapped 5 x 7 photos, and were quite the hassle to transport. "These old Graflexes have limited shutter speeds because the tension springs are tired with age. I was able to shoot at 650/sec at f8. The lens has a focal length of 1000mm," said photographery Geoffrey Berliner. Continue reading for more pictures, including a test shot, and additional information.

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Abraham Lincoln Without Beard

Photo credit: Marina Amaral via Bored Panda

What if we could see the past in full vibrant color, like it should be viewed. Well, thanks to artists like Marina Amaral, we're able to see many historical photographs like never before. She combines her interest in history, with Photoshop, to create these incredible recreations. "When we look at the photo in color, we can easily have the feeling that we are living that moment again," said Amaral. Continue reading to see more.

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Steinwinter Supercargo

The Steinwinter Supercargo 2040 Cab was essentially a vehicle built to decrease the size and aerodynamic drag of the typical semi-truck. However, this strange design proved unpopular with drivers and suffered from handling problems - testing was stopped after 3000km. It was first unveiled at the 1983 Frankfurt Motor Show, is based on a Mercedes chassis, and powered by a 400hp Daimler-Benz engine. Other features included an independent air suspension, limited slip differential, anti-lock brakes, and climate control. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny Facebook status updates and funny autocorrect texts gallery. Continue reading for a viral video showing why molten table salt and water is an explosive mix, literally.

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Rocket to the Moon


The show was originally named Rocket to the Moon and it opened in 1955 along with Disneyland. The ride was refurbished as Flight to the Moon in 1967. On March 21, 1975, the destination was changed to Mars because humans had already been to the Moon. During that time, the attraction was considerably dated. The show was designed in cooperation with NASA and was basically a revised and updated version of the previous attraction Flight to the Moon. Guests would now be launched on a spacecraft into space and then approach the surface of the red planet Mars. Continue reading for more fascinating historical pictures.

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Heart Attack Pistol

This unclassified footage reportedly shows a modified Colt 1911 pistol that shoots a dart, filled with a special serum, that causes a heart attack when fired into the victim, leaving no trace, other than a red dot. That's right, it can pierce through clothing without leaving signs of impact on the skin, and the serum dissolves without a trace. "The poison was frozen into some sort of dart and then it was shot at very high speed into the person. When it reached the person it would melt inside them, and there would be a tiny red dot on their body, which was hard to detect. There wouldn't be a needle or anything like that left in the person," said whistleblower Mary Embree. Continue reading for the unedited clip.

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Albert Einstein Office

Most of you already know that Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist. He developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics, alongside quantum mechanics. On the eve of World War II, he endorsed a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt alerting him to the potential development of "extremely powerful bombs of a new type" and recommending that the U.S. begin similar research. The image above shows the physicist in his office at work. Continue reading for more amazing colorized historical photos.

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