tech e blog

Old Hard Drive 1950s IBM

Hard drives with massive storage capacities are getting smaller, but back in 1956, it was an entirely different story. Introduced by IBM in 1956, HDDs became the dominant secondary storage device for general-purpose computers by the early 1960s. Assembled with covers, the 350 was 60 inches long, 68 inches high and 29 inches deep. It was configured with 50 magnetic disks containing 50,000 sectors, each of which held 100 alphanumeric characters, for a capacity of 5 million characters. Disks rotated at 1,200 rpm, tracks (20 to the inch) were recorded at up to 100 bits per inch, and typical head-to-disk spacing was 800 micro-inches. Continue reading for more interesting photos.

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Lamborghini Marzal

If DeLorean and Lamborghini made a car, it would probably be the Marzal, which made its official debut at the 1967 Geneva Motor Show. Designed by Marcello Gandini of Bertone, it was created to supply Ferruccio Lamborghini with a true four-seater car for his lineup which already included the 400GT 2+2 and the Miura. Continue reading for five cool and unusual things you may not have known about this stylish supercar.

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Ford GT90

You've probably heard of the Ford GT / GT 40, now here's a rare look at the GT90. It was first unveiled in January 1995 at the Detroit Auto Show as "the world's mightiest supercar". It's powered by a quad-turbocharged 720hp V12 engine, mated to a 5-speed manual gearbox, enabling it to hit a top speed of 235mph. The exhaust, which was claimed to be hot enough to damage the body panels, required ceramic tiles similar to those on the Space Shuttle to keep the car from melting. Continue reading for two videos, including a Top Gear test by Jeremy Clarkson, and more information.

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Swiss Watch Chinese Tomb 400-Year-Old Time Travel

Archaeologists were perplexed after finding a 100-year-old Swiss watch in an ancient Ming dynasty tomb that was sealed more than 400 years in Shangsi, southern China, since its occupant's funeral. That's right, they uncovered a miniature watch in the shape of a ring marked 'Swiss' that is thought to be just a century old. It was encrusted in mud and rock and had stopped at 10:06 am. Watches were not around at the time of the Ming Dynasty and Switzerland was not even a country, an expert pointed out. Continue reading for more interesting historical artifacts.

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Ford Beatnik Bubbletop

It looks like something straight out of The Jetsons, but the 1955 Ford "Beanik" Bubbletop is no computer-generated vehicle. This outstanding looking custom automobile is up for grabs. It started as a 1955 Ford, but now rides on a modified 1988 Lincoln Town Car chassis, and the rear bumper is actually a front bumper taken from a '58 Cadillac. The car was created by Gary "Chopit" Fioto, as many parts had to be custom fabricated, including the teardrop skirts, pancaked hood and the largest-ever handcrafted Bubbletop roof. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Back to the Future Then vs Now

Photo credit: Jared Cowan via Acidcow

Back to the Future's Hill Valley town square scenes were shot at Courthouse Square, located in the Universal Studios back lot because, as Bob Gale said: "...because no city is going to let a film crew remodel their town to look like it's in the 1950s." The filmmakers "decided to shoot all the 50s stuff first, and make the town look real beautiful and wonderful. Then we would just totally trash it down and make it all bleak and ugly for the 1980s scenes." The interiors for Doc Brown's house were shot at the Robert R. Blacker House, while exteriors took place at Gamble House. The exterior shots of the Twin Pines Mall, and later the Lone Pine Mall (from 1985) were shot at the Puente Hills Mall in City of Industry, California. The exterior shots and some interior scenes at Hill Valley High School were filmed at Whittier High School in Whittier, California. Continue reading for more then and now shots of famous locations.

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BMW M1

Set to be auctioned off in August, this BMW M1 is a supercar that time forgot, and in prime condition. It was originally designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro, and hand-built between the years of 1978 - 1981, for a total production of 453 vehicles. Powered by a naturally aspirated 3.5L inline-six that generates 273hp, it has a top speed of 162 mph - turbocharged racing versions were capable of producing around 850hp. Continue reading for two videos and more information.

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Lamborghini LM002

The Urus may be just months away from its official debut, but long before that futuristic-looking vehicle, there was the rugged Lamborghini LM002. Also known as the "Rambo Lambo," it's one of the most excessive vehicles ever produced, weighing a hefty 5,952-pounds and powered by the same 450hp 5.2L Quattrovalvole V12 engine from the Countach. It was capable of sprinting from 0-60mph in 7.7-seconds and has a top speed of 130mph. Believe it or not, the fuel tank capacity was 76 gallons to ensure that your personal safari won't be abruptly interrupted by the LM002's extreme guzzling. Continue reading for three videos and more information.

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Antarctic Snow Cruiser

Before the monster trucks, off-road SUVs and giant exploration vehicles of today, there was the Antarctic Snow Cruiser. It was designed from 1937 to 1939 by Thomas Poulter, intended to facilitate transport in Antarctica. The Snow Cruiser was also known as "The Penguin," "Penguin 1" or "Turtle". Some of its innovative features at the time included: Wheels and tires retracted into housings where they were heated by engine exhaust gases to prevent low-temperature cracking of the natural rubber compound; Long front and rear overhangs on the body to assist with crossing crevasses up to 15 feet (4.6 m) wide; The front wheels were to be retracted so the front could be pushed across the crevasse. The front wheels were then to be extended (and the rear wheels retracted) to pull the vehicle the rest of the way across. Continue reading for two videos and more information.

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Game Boy Light

Smartphones and portable game consoles today all come with backlit screens, but back in the day, you actually needed a special light attachment to play in the dark. For those who don't remember, there were also other Game Boy accessories as well, including a camera + printer, Super Game Boy (lets you play GB games on television), battery pack and even a pocket sonar by Bandai, which is a fish-finder peripheral. Continue reading for more funny and geeky things people born after 1999 probably won't understand.

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