tech e blog

LED Chandelier

Officially called "A Chandelier for One of Many Possible Ends", light installation flickers and clicks when local ambient radioactivity is detected, thanks to the 92 Geiger counters connected to each of the hanging LED lighting elements. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster of 2011 drove artist Phillip David Stearns to create this installation. If the sculpture ever fully illuminates it would indicate fatal levels of ambient radiation. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny Facebook status updates gallery. Continue reading for a viral video showing why foil boarding is awesome.

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Origami Adam Tram

Adam Tram from Vietnam doesn't bother folding paper airplanes, but rather intricate dinosaurs, insects and more. On a related note, origami paperfolding traditions arose in Europe, China, and Japan which have been well-documented by historians. These seem to have been mostly separate traditions, until the 20th century. In the early 1900s, Akira Yoshizawa, Kosho Uchiyama, and others began creating and recording original origami works. Akira Yoshizawa in particular was responsible for a number of innovations, such as wet-folding and the Yoshizawa-Randlett diagramming system, and his work inspired a renaissance of the art form. Continue reading to see more.

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Hippopotamus Chair

Photo credit: Maximo Riera

Maximo Riera is a talented artist known for his custom "Animal Chairs" collection, and he's unveiled his latest piece: the Hippopotamus Chair. Not just any hippopotamus, this chair is the size of its real-life counterpart and upholstered in his signature all-black, high-luxury style, complete with realistic detailing. Continue reading to see more pictures of this piece and some of his past work.

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Real Batman Suit

Photo credit: Armatus Designs

Jackson Gordon, a 21-year-old college student from Wayne, Pennsylvania, spent over 5-months creating a real-life Batman suit, which he says isn't bullet-proof (yet), but can withstand punches, machetes and even swings from a baseball bat. Gordon says: "Before actually making the real suit, I did many (at least 10) prototypes of different parts for the suit to test out materials and sewing patterns. Once I was happy with those, I started making the real suit using the patterns I had decided on from the prototypes. I cut out the internal lining fabric, then added the foam padding, then a layer (or two depending on which part of the suit) of kevlar, then the top grey fabric." Continue reading for a video, more pictures and additional information.

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Black Walnut Turntable

Not just any turntables, these are made from the cross-sections of black walnut trees by Kent Walter and his father through their Seattle-based company, Silvan Audio Workshop. Currently, they're sending these handmade turntables to Kickstarter supporters who offer $750 pledges. More form than function, the record players feature transparent glass platters to show off the rich wood bases. Walter says: "The music that we like is unique, it's got life, it's distinctive. We think that the things we play it on should be the same way." Click here to view the first image in this week's demotivational poster gallery. Continue reading for a viral video showing why you should never mess with praying mantises.

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Boggling Optical Illusion

At first glance, this girl looks to be transparent, but it's just a clever mirror illusion. This is a self-portrait of photographer Laura Williams, an 18-year-old artist from Cambridge, UK. The mirror illusion was completed in post-production using Photoshop with the idea of being 'invisible' or 'transparent'. Continue reading for more optical illusions that will boggle your mind.

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Comic Book Makeup

Photo credit: Neil Zeller Photography

Lianne Moseley, a talented artist from Canada, doesn't rely on Photoshop to transform real people into comic characters, just makeup. She's self-trained and is normally hired for weddings and personal photo shoots, but loves spending her free time bringing superheroes to life, shading and all. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny work pictures gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of an adorable talking husky puppy.

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OakOak Street Art

Street art is essentially visual art created in public locations, usually unsanctioned artwork executed outside of the context of traditional art venues. Artists who choose the streets as their gallery are often doing so from a preference to communicate directly with the public at large, free from perceived confines of the formal art world. They often travel between countries to spread their designs. Some artists, like OakOak (above), have gained cult-followings, media and art world attention, and have gone on to work commercially in the styles which made their work known on the streets. Continue reading for more.

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Bee Teapot

This is no ordinary teapot, as designer Tomas Gabzdil Libertiny of Studio Libertiny used an army of 60,000 bees to complete Thousand Years, his latest experimental beeswax sculpture. It was commissioned by the French fine silver manufacturer Christofle and created with the help of Dutch beekeeper Johan Beckers. To create the shape, he first constructed a metal scaffold that served as the framework for beehive before letting nature take over. Continue reading for a video, more pictures and additional information.

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Faith in Humanity Restored

There are internet memes for just about everything these days, and one of the most popular is "Faith in Humanity Restored". It's basically an expression indicating an event or good deed has improved one's opinion of human beings. The phrase can be seen as the antithesis of I don't want to live on this planet anymore. Where did this meme first begin? On October 3rd, 2000, a post titled "Nice Things That Restore my Faith in Humanity" was submitted to the writing database Everything2 by user Nailbunny, which featured a short story about a heartfelt phone call from a close friend. Continue reading for more.

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