tech e blog

Camera Aperture Ring Box

Photo credit: Matt Chalker

At first glance, this appears to be a camera shutter, but twist it open, and you'll find a diamond ring, or any other surprise you'd like. Matt Chalker spent 50-60 hours making the geeky creation above, which opens / closes like the aperture on a camera, to propose to his photographer girlfriend. "All of the wood is Ipe, the sleeve is machinable brass, the leaves are bronze shim stock, the pins (invisible when assembled) are 0.060" brass and the cushion is made from some sliced up nerf darts covered in velvet. It works by twisting the sleeve and the bottom wood base," said Chalker. Continue reading to see the build process from start to finish.

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Modulo Camera

Photo credit: Peta Pixel

Say goodbye to overexposed photos, and hello to the Modulo Camera. Developed by MIT researchers, this camera captures a high dynamic range photo with every exposure. "No more will photographers or even ordinary people have to fumble with aperture size and exposure length. The algorithm would enable people simply to click the camera button and let the computer deal with exposure problems. The modulo camera can potentially transform the way everyday photography works," writes lead scientist Hang Zhao. Click here to view the first image in this week's geek life gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of the 24-hours of endless sun those stationed in Antarctica get to experience every summer October - February.

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First Version Everyday Things

Steven Sasson as an engineer at Eastman Kodak invented and built the first electronic camera using a charge-coupled device image sensor in 1975. Earlier ones used a camera tube; later ones digitized the signal. Early uses were mainly military and scientific; followed by medical and news applications. However, the history of the digital camera dates back to 1961 with Eugene F. Lally of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who when he wasn't coming up with ways to create artificial gravity was thinking about how to use a mosaic photosensor to capture digital images. His idea was to take pictures of the planets and stars while travelling through space to give information about the astronauts' position. Unfortunately, as with Texas Instrument employee Willis Adcock's filmless camera (US patent 4,057,830) in 1972, the technology had yet to catch up with the concept. Click here to view the first image in this week's WINS gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a working V6 engine made entirely from paper.

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Canon ME20F-SH 4-Million ISO Camera

Canon reveals their all-new Canon ME20F-SH, a multi-purpose, full-frame 35mm camera that has a maximum ISO of 4,000,000, making it perfect for shots in near darkness. Its specialized sensor enables users to shoot Full HD video while subjects are illuminated with less than 0.0005 lux - full moon on a clear night is 0.27-1.0 lux. The company says that practical uses include: cinematic production, reality television, nature documentaries, and security as well as surveillance. Expect to shell out $30,000 for this camera when it hits stores in December 2015. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny school pictures gallery. Continue reading for a viral video showing Google Translate taking on "La Bamba".

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Z E1 4K Camera

Why bother with a GoPro, when you could have a movie-quality camera in your pocket? Introducing the Z E1, a pocket-sized camera with a Micro Four Thirds lens mount, Wi-Fi 802.11N, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and a 16-megapixel camera sensor capable of shooting 4K (4096 x 2160) video at 24 fps. That's not all, it's great for low-light situations, thanks to an advanced 3D noise filtration system using motion compensated temporal filtering (MCTF) technology. Continue reading for a video and more information on how to get your own for under $600.

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Sphericam 2

Sphericam 2 is essentially a 360° camera that enables its users to capture everything around them without any blind spots. Slightly smaller than a tennis ball, Sphericam 2 contains 6-cameras in total that each record in stunning 4K resolution. WiFi-connectivity allows you to stream content right to your desktop or smartphone. You can even use the mobile app to start/stop recording, monitor the view while recording, transfer, view and edit their footage on-the-fly. Not just for recording video, Sphericam 2 is also VR ready (Samsung Gear, Oculus, etc.). Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Sony RX100 IV

Sony's RX100 IV might be a compact camera, but it certainly doesn't lack features, especially in the slow motion video department. According to PetaPixel, "Photographer David Candlish got a chance to play with a pre-release RX100 IV yesterday, and he shot the 40x slow motion clip seen above that shows what the RX100 IV is capable of. The camera was handheld and a couple of tabletop LEDs provided lighting. When shooting with the 1000fps feature, 2 seconds of real time becomes a whopping 80 seconds of slow-motion video." Product page. Continue reading for the video and more information.

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GoPro Hero4 Session

GoPro's all-new Hero4 Session can be submerged 33-feet underwater without a special housing, and it's no larger than an ice cube to boot. Recording is a simple one button press for capturing 8-megapixel photos as well as 1080p60, 720p100 or 1440p30 video. It features two microphones: one on the front of the camera and one on the back. When you're filming in windy conditions or during high-speed activities like motorsports, the camera automatically switches to the mic that's best-suited for capturing optimal audio. The accompanying GoPro app gives you complete control over your entire shooting experience. Get more info here. Continue reading for two videos previewing its features and recording quality.

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Olympus Air 01

The Olympus Air 01 literally turns your smartphone into a DSLR camera, complete with interchangeable micro 4/3 lenses, for just $299 (body only). It combines a high speed 16 megapixel LIVE MOS sensor, TruePic VII Image Processor and the highest quality of all digital M.Zuiko Lenses to offer stunning photography. It features a 1/16,000th of a second shutter and fires off shots at an impressive 10 frames per second. Product page. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Explorer Camera Ball

Bounce Imaging unveils Explorer, softball-sized, tactical camera ball with six different lenses surrounded by LED lights that takes several photos per second out of each lens at the same time. The raw images it takes are then stitched together by an integrated processor within a fraction of a second to provide 360° images, before being transmitted straight to the user's smartphone. IB Times says it's designed to help police, "who often face entering potentially dangerous situations where armed gunmen might be waiting, as well as emergency responders, who routinely need to enter collapsed or burning buildings to rescue people, as well as locations with chemical leaks." Click here to view the first image in this week's funny school pictures gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of the first full-length Steve Jobs movie trailer, starring Michael Fassbender.

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