tech e blog

Self-Solving Rubik's Cube

Love Rubik's Cubes, but can never quite solve one? Well, this innovative 3D-printed, self-solving version might be just what you need. A Japanese inventor made this a reality with a host of servo motors, Arduino boards and lots of trial & error. Unfortunately, there's no detailed manual explaining how everything works, but its creator did upload a disassembly video. Continue reading to watch and for more information.

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Bumblebee Transformers Scrap Metal

Photo credit: Kreat Works via Bored Panda

Thailand-based KreatWorks specializes in transforming scrap metal and other recycled materials into incredible sculptures, like the Bumblebee you see above. Don't have the money or space for a massive piece? They also can make you a mini sculpture of everything from Darth Vader to Wall-E. One caveat: if you want the former, each large sculpture takes one artist approximately 45-60 days to complete. Continue reading for more pictures.

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Koncepto Millenya Sports Car

Kyxz Mendiola, an amateur engineer, was tired of the traffic jams in the Philippines. So, he started building his very own flying sports car about 6-years-ago, and "Koncepto Millenya" is the result. "We've been having bad weather so it took as a while after our deadline before we can finally show it to our followers. But after two months of tuning, here it is. I hope everyone will give this vehicle a positive reaction," said Mendiola. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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Tommy Wiseau The Room

If you watched James Franco's "The Disaster Artist," and have always wanted the original, now is your chance. Tommy Wiseau has uploaded the full "The Room" movie onto YouTube for your viewing pleasure, without requiring payment of any sort. For those who have not seen either, just know that a number of publications have labeled "The Room" one of the worst films ever made, but one that has become a cult classic. Continue reading to watch the movie in its entirety.

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Interstellar Miller Planet Water

For those who have seen Christopher Nolan's Interstellar film, you probably already know that Miller's planet is a water-world, and the first planet in the system orbiting Gargantua. It takes its name from Dr. Miller, who landed on the planet and activated the "thumbs up" beacon, and it's also the first location the crew of the Endurance visit. The time dilation factor is exactly 1 hour on Milller per 7 years of Earth time due to the gravitational forces of Gargantua moving the planet through empty space at roughly 99.99999998% the speed of light. Continue reading to watch the scene in full and for more information.

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DIY Camera Periscope

Photo credit: Peta Pixel

Alex of the YouTube channel "I Did a Thing" recently uploaded a video showing how you can make a DIY periscope to film underwater with just about any camera for a mere $10. The main components you'll need are a PVC pipe, PVC elbow joint, a sheet of glass from picture frame, and a bargain store mirror. Simply attach the glass to serve as an underwater window, attach the mirror at a 45° to one end of the PVC pipe, glue everything together, and you're ready to shoot. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Joaquin Phoenix Joker

In a new video from "The Joker" (2019) movie director Todd Phillips, we see Joaquin Phoenix in his plainclothes character as the DC Comics villain (Arthur Fleck) lookng into the camera lens. As the movie progresses, Arthur's mouth morphs into a smile and Phillips' version of Joker's iconic makeup is projected across the actor's face. Continue reading to see the morphing clip.

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Star Wars Anime

Star Wars: A New Hope was first released in US theaters on May 25, 1977, and earned $461 million, while receiving ten Academy Award nominations (including Best Picture), winning seven. It launched an industry of tie-in products, including spin-off TV series, novels, comic books, video games, amusement park attractions, and merchandise including toys, games, and clothing. The latest is this anime fan makeover by Dmitry "Ahriman" Grozov of Saint Petersburg, Russia. Continue reading for another Star Wars anime short film and more information.

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Ames Window Illusion

The Ames Window illusion from the 1940s still boggles minds today, and it's basically an image on a flat piece of cardboard that seems to be a rectangular window but is, in fact, a trapezoid, with both sides of the piece of cardboard have the same image. The cardboard is hung vertically from a wire so it can rotate around continuously, or is attached to a vertical mechanically rotating axis for continuous rotation. When the rotation of the window is observed, the window appears to rotate through less than 180 degrees, though the exact amount of travel that is perceived varies with the dimensions of the trapezoid. It seems that the rotation stops momentarily and reverses its direction. It is therefore not perceived to be rotating continuously in one direction but instead is mis-perceived to be oscillating. Continue reading for two more videos and information.

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A Real Hobbit House

Lord of the Rings fanatic Jim Costigan has always wanted his very own Hobbit House, and couldn't wait any longer, so he took things into his own hands. A New York construction supervisor by day, he spent over 6-years building the energy-efficient living space, complete with a curved shape, green roof, thermal bridge-free construction that provides a tightly insulated shell, as well as triple-pane thermal windows and a heat recovery ventilator. Continue reading for another video, more pictures and additional information.

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