tech e blog

Alien Actor

Photo credit: Bored Panda

For most of the film's scenes the Alien was portrayed by Bolaji Badejo. A latex costume was specifically made to fit Badejo's 6-foot-10-inch (208 cm) slender frame, made by taking a full-body plaster cast of him. Badejo attended t'ai chi and mime classes in order to create convincing movements for the Alien. However, in a few scenes, such as when the Alien lowers itself from the ceiling to kill Brett, the creature was portrayed by stuntmen Eddie Powell and Roy Scammell; in that scene a costumed Powell was suspended on wires and then lowered in an unfurling motion. Continue reading to see more actors outside their parts, compiled by Bored Panda. Click here for a few bonus images.

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USB Microscope

Plugable's USB Microscope is no toy, as it offers up to 250x magnification, and you can get one for just $29.97, today only, originally $59.99. The microscope includes built-in LEDs that can be dialed through a range of brightness levels to properly illuminate your subject. Unlike many other USB microscopes, these LEDs shine through a diffuser to combat glare. They used a capacitive touch button to initiate image capture rather than a physical push button. When viewing small objects at microscopic levels, the slightest bump can offset an image to an unviewable state. With a capacitive button, the lightest touch snaps a blur-free image. Product page. Continue reading for another video review and more information.

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How to Extract a Splinter

Photo credit: Bored Panda

Survival hacks are one thing, these strange life hacks, digitized by the New York Public Library, found in cigarette boxes from over 100 years ago, are another. Many of them may not be practical in today's world, but learning how to extract a splinter back in the day wasn't as simple as hopping on Google. These cigarette cards were popular collectibles, and were included in every pack purchased. Yes, the famous 1909 T206 Honus Wagner baseball card was also found in American Tobacco Company cigarette packs. Continue reading for more interesting life hacks from the early 1900s. Click here for a few bonus images.

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lego-key-holder.jpg

Photo credit: Bored Panda

LEGO bricks can be found in all shapes and sizes, but rarely do you find use for them outside of display purposes. However, these creative geeks aim to change that with these custom creations, like this key / cable / accessory holder. Simply put, all you need is to secure a small base plate onto a table or other flat surface, attach a few minifigs and / or bricks onto a keyring, and you're set to organize. Continue reading for more geeky ways to use LEGO bricks. Click here for a few bonus images.

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Automatic Bullseye Dartboard

Former NASA engineer Mark Rober spent the past 3-years creating a robotic dartboard that almost guarantees a bullseye every throw, or at least if the conditions are met. His creation consists of a Vicon motion capture system with 6-cameras that track the dart using infrared LEDs and darts equipped with retro-reflectors attached, which are used determine its exact location in 3D space. The trajectory of the dart can be then calculated with physics to predict where it will hit with extreme accuracy. The dartboard itself is attached to two sliders with a system of six stepper motors to maneuver it around. Once the motion tracking system calculates the bullseye location, a computer then transmits instructions to move the board, and all of this happens in milliseconds. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of the world's simplest electric train.

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LEGO Instant Camera

Fujifilm's Instax may be more convenient than building your own instant camera, but a photographer from Hong Kong decided to do just that, and with LEGO bricks. Simply put, a Yashica 80mm F3.5 camera, Fuji Instax, and LEGO pieces were combined to create a unique device that prints photos instantly. It comes equipped with a preview screen up top that enables users to compose the photo, while a shutter button in front snaps the picture. The eject button is hidden behind a secret LEGO door on the side, and a simple push lets the instant film pop out from the top. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Skull Fire Logs

Photo credit: Hi Consumption

These human skull fire logs may not be the most practical, but they're most certainly an interesting coversation piece. Each one is handmade from reinforced steel that has been coated with lave granules and fireproof ceramic, the same kind NASA uses to test rocket engines. They measure between 8 and 9 inches in diameter, and can be used many times over. Get them here now. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Honda NM4 Ghost in the Shell

Photo credit: Empire

Ghost in the Shell follows the Major (Scarlett Johansson), special ops, one-of-a-kind human-cyborg hybrid, who leads the elite task force Section 9. Devoted to stopping the most dangerous criminals and extremists, Section 9 is faced with an enemy whose singular goal is to wipe out Hanka Robotic's advancements in cyber technology. Here's a first look at the modified Honda NM4 motorcycle that will be Major's vehicle of choice in the film. Click here to view the first image in this week's things that look like other things gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of John Wick with NERF guns.

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LEGO Tape

LEGO fans rejoice! Nimuno Loops is basically flexible, LEGO-compatible adhesive tape that can be cut into any size and stuck onto any flat surface. That's right, it transforms surfaces, like walls, refrigerators, even your shoes, into brick-building plates. Right now, you can pre-order two rolls of tape 6.5 feet in length for $11, while xix rolls (two red, blue, and green) sets you back $34. Continue reading for another video, more pictures, information, and the Indiegogo page.

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Dinosaur Tail Feather Amber

In this small piece of amber, dating back to the mid-Cretaceous Period approximately 99-million-years ago, paleotologist Lida Xing of China University of Geosciences discovered a perfectly preserved dinosaur tail feather from a juvenile coelurosaur. This theropod dinosaur - belonging to the same family as the tyrannosaurs - was about the size of a sparrow. "It's visually stunning and the level of detail on the specimen is not something I was expecting at all. I've done a lot of work on amber from dinosaur bone digs in places like Alberta and Saskatchewan, and there's always the hope that maybe you'll find a fragment of a feather. This actually has part of the animal in it in terms of the skeletal remains too. It's a totally different ball game," said co-author Ryan McKellar of the Royal Saskatchewan Museum in Canada. Continue reading for more fascinating images from around the web.

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