tech e blog

SanDisk 240GB SSD

SanDisk's Internal 240GB SSD Plus is the perfect upgrade for anyone looking to supercharge their computer on a budget, as it can be picked up for $69.99 shipped, today only, originally $114.99. With read speeds of up to 520 MB/s, this solid state drive (SSD) performs up to 23 times faster than a typical hard disk drive. You'll appreciate faster startups, shutdowns, data transfers, and application response times than with a typical hard disk drive. Product page. Continue reading for an actual read / write speed test video.

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Toshiba Canvio Portable HDD

Toshiba's Canvio Connect II 2TB Portable Hard Drive takes portable storage to the next level, complete with secure remote access, local / cloud backup and the ability to share and stream your content, all for $79.99 shipped, today only, originally $189. With the mobile feature on the Canvio Connect you can access and share even if you leave it at home. As long as it's hooked up to your computer, you can get to your photos, music, movies and even massive files from any PC, smartphone or tablet over the Internet. Product page. Continue reading for a video unboxing and more information.

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MyDigitalSSD 128GB

MyDigitalSSD's 128GB OTG is basically an ultra portable plug and play solid state drive that offers total USB 3.0 5Gbps performance with any USB Attached SCSI Protocol (UASP) compliant system resulting in real SSD speeds up to 460MB/s, and for just $64.99 shipped, today only. Comparatively, with this power, the OTG would be rated 3000x if it were a flash drive. Product page. Continue reading for another picture and more information.

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Samsung Portable SSD T1

The Samsung T1 may be smaller than a credit card, but this SSD (Solid State Drive) packs a powerful punch, with capacities ranging from 250GB - 1TB. Weighing in at just 1 ounce, it's about as heavy as the included 5-inch USB cable, but on the inside, you'll find 3D-vertical NAND flash memory, which are memory cells stacked in up to 32 layers, greatly increasing the density and storage space for less cost. It also supports Samsung's Turbo Write (450 MB/s) technology, in which during write operations, data is first written to this zone at high speeds, then, during idle periods, moved from the buffer to the primary storage region, resulting in much faster performance from the user's perspective. Get a 250GB for under $100 now. Click here to vie wthe first image in this week's funny work pictures gallery. Continue reading for a viral video on how the International Space Station works.

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NES Cartridge Hard Drive Mod

Photo credit: Cheesey24 / Imgur

Repurposing an old game cartridge isn't something new, but this is one of the first projects we've seen with a custom label. Imgur user "cheesey24" started with an old hard drive and a Championship Bowling cartridge, but gutting the latter wasn't the easiest of tasks. Since Nintendo uses custom screws, he had to make his own tool - using an old runner from a model kit and a lighter to mold it - before cracking open the case. After some dremeling, a custom label from UnconventionalHacker and securing the hard drive, the rest is history. Continue reading to see the project from start to finish.

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Old Hard Drive 1950s IBM

Hard drives with massive storage capacities are getting smaller, but back in 1956, it was an entirely different story. Introduced by IBM in 1956, HDDs became the dominant secondary storage device for general-purpose computers by the early 1960s. Assembled with covers, the 350 was 60 inches long, 68 inches high and 29 inches deep. It was configured with 50 magnetic disks containing 50,000 sectors, each of which held 100 alphanumeric characters, for a capacity of 5 million characters. Disks rotated at 1,200 rpm, tracks (20 to the inch) were recorded at up to 100 bits per inch, and typical head-to-disk spacing was 800 micro-inches. Continue reading for more interesting photos.

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WD My Book 3TB

WD's My Book 3TB USB 3.0 Portable Hard Drive is optimized for the fastest possible data transfer rates and provides a complete backup solution to protect your precious memories and your critical system files, all for $86.99 shipped, originally $169.99. Gain peace of mind knowing that your data is protected from unauthorized access with password protection and hardware encryption. Product page.

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200GB SanDisk Ultra MicroSDXC

SanDisk's Ultra 200GB MicroSDXC Card is now the world's highest capacity, previously the 128GB, despite being fingernail-sized. It can store up to 20-hours of full HD video, as well as transfer 1200 photos per minute with an ultra-fast transfer speed of up to 90 MB/s. Built to perform in extreme conditions, SanDisk Ultra micro SDXC cards are water proof, temperature proof, shock proof, X-ray proof and magnet proof. Product page. Continue reading for two videos and more information.

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SanDisk Ultra 64GB

SanDisk's Ultra 64GB UHS-I/Class 10 Micro SDXC Memory Card (Up to 48MB/s transfer) w/Adapter is perfect for cameras, smartphones, drones, along with many more mobile devices, and you can get one today only for $24.99, originally $34.99. Designed to be extremely durable, the memory card is waterproof, temperature proof, X-ray proof, magnet proof, and shockproof, complete with a lifetime warranty. Product page. Continue reading for an unboxing video and more information.

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Toshiba 5TB HDD

Toshiba's 5TB SATA 6Gb/s 7200rpm Hard Drive ensures that you'll never run out of space, and for just $159.99 shipped, originally $399.99. Read/Write cache for increased performance. Internal shock sensor and ramp loading technology to help protect your drive. Get it here now. Continue reading for an unboxing and review video.

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