tech e blog

Inside Instruments

Photographer Mierswa Kluska teamed up with designers Mona Sibai and Bjorn Ewers to come up with a creative print campaign for the Berlin Philharmonic orchestra, and what happened next is something you'd expect to see in a fantasy film. The team used macro photographs taken inside the cramped spaces of instruments - violin, cello, flute, and pipe organ - to make them appear as cavernous rooms that can be walked around in. So wonderfully done. Click here to view the first image in this week's WINS gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of an incredible 60-sided geodesic dome carved entirely from wood.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo


Floppy Drive Songs

YouTube user "MrSolidSnake745" is known for his floppy drive renditions of popular songs, and for July 4th, he decided to upload a special version of "The Star Spangled Banner". For those who have no idea what floppy drives are, in the early 1980s, a number of manufacturers introduced smaller floppy drives and media in various formats. A consortium of 21 companies eventually settled on a 3.5-inch floppy disk (actually 90 mm wide) a.k.a. Micro diskette, Micro disk, or Micro floppy, similar to a Sony design, but improved to support both single-sided and double-sided media, with formatted capacities generally of 360 KB and 720 KB respectively. Single-sided drives shipped in 1983, and double sided in 1984. What became the most common format, the double-sided, high-density (HD) 1.44 MB disk drive, shipped in 1986. Continue reading for more.

Continue Reading


Vertical Record Player

Photo credit: Roy Harpaz via My Modern Met

Roy Harpaz, an industrial designer, has just released his latest invention, "Toc". Simply put, it's a vertical record player that's beeen given a modern makeover, complete with remote control functionality, LED touch buttons and a sensor that scans the record for different songs, enabling you to easily skip between tracks. There are special spherical bearings to let you play previously unplayable vinyl. Its front panel casing is made from CNC-cut walnut wood that seamlessly blends with the rest of your home entertainment system. Continue reading for more pictures.

Continue Reading


Stratton Skull Violin

Looking like something from a horror movie, Stratton's $2,999 Skull Violin is fully-functional and is perfect for concerts. According to Stratton, "The death's-head shape of this natural wood Stratton electric violin definitely makes a statement. That statement is backed up by a rich, focused tone from the Barbera Twin Hybrid transducer system, providing a strong output signal that's great for acoustic styles, but also exceptionally well-suited for use with high-gain effects in high-volume performances." Continue reading for a video and more information.

Continue Reading


Millennium Falcon Guitar

UK-based designer Tom Bingham is a diehard Star Wars fan who took Millennium Falcon toy and transformed it into a fully-functional guitar. That's not all, for his "Star Wars Spaceships Electric Guitars" line, he also crafted functional musical instruments from a B-Wing Fighter and Y-Wing Fighter. The 64-year-old spent countless hours over the span of 3-months to build out this awesome collection of guitars. Unfortunately, there's no Death Star version in the works...yet. Click here to view the first image in this week's demotivational posters gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of two baby bears caught fighting in the middle of the road in Yellowstone.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo


Super Mario Bros. Guitar

An internet user who goes by the name "Geeked Out" has created a guitar that appears to be straight from the Mushroom Kingdom. The Australian artist designed the guitar's body to replicate the silhouette of Mario from the iconic Super Mario Bros. franchise. No detail was spared, as it also includes mushroom inlays that run along the neck of the guitar. Continue reading for a video and an interesting fact about Mario's many voice actors.

Continue Reading


Stainless Steel Bass Guitar

This is not a futuristic weapon, just Stash's stainless steel bass guitar. Not just for looks, there are quite a few benefits that a full metal instrument offers, such as durability, but also the fact that stainless steel won't be impacted by temperature changes the same way a wooden bass would be. One caveat: prices start at $3,000. Continue reading for two videos and more information.

Continue Reading


Honeycomb Sleeping Cells

From afar, they look like giant honeycombs, but step closer, and you'll realize that they're actually sleeping cells. Designed by Belgium-based designers B-AND-BEE, each one of these cozy cells contain a king-size bed, complete with a warm wooden finish, and a pull-down shade for added privacy. The stackable modular design means you can fit a bunch of people in a small space, making it perfect for music festivals and similar events. Continue reading for more pictures.

Continue Reading


360 Degree Drum Kit

Sure, it's not practical or usable in a concert setting, but Yamaha's 360° spherical drum kit is definitely the coolest-looking one we've seen yet. It was designed by Yamaha's motorcycle division, and a company representative said: "This design seeks to create an ideal form that will allow human beings to go beyond existing methods to express themselves. The design resembles a globe and allows performers to let their imaginations run wild on an assortment of different kinds of drums. Energy erupts centered on the performer and creates an increasingly visually dynamic world of sound." Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos of today, including a SpaceX launch in 4K resolution.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo


Two-String Piezoelectric Violin

What happens when you combine 3D-printing technology with a musical instrument? You get this beautiful two-string piezoelectric violin. It will make its official debut at the 3D Print Design Show in New York, and was designed by architects Eric Goldemberg and Veronica Zalcberg of MONAD Studio. Goldemberg says: "Our desire to create unusual instruments emerged when we realized the aesthetic and technical issues we were facing as architects did not differ much from those of musicians and composers." Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos of today, including "Artoo in Love, an R2-D2 love story.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo