tech e blog

Floppy Drive Songs

Yes, these are the 3.5-inch floppy disk drives computers used to have, but now they can be used to play entire songs, thanks to a special circuit that vibrates a floppy disk head at particular frequencies to make music. In the early 1980s, a number of manufacturers introduced smaller floppy drives and media in various formats. Companies eventually settled on a 3.5-inch floppy disk, similar to a Sony design, but improved to support both single-sided and double-sided media, with formatted capacities generally of 360 KB and 720 KB respectively. All 3.5-inch disks have a rectangular hole in one corner which, if obstructed, write-enabled the disk. The HD 1.44 MB disks have a second, unobstructed hole in the opposite corner which identifies them as being of that capacity. Continue reading for more.

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360-Degree Piano PianoArc

At first glance, this 360-degree piano might seem like something straight from a fantasy movie, but it's a real functional musical instrument, developed by Brockett Parsons, who just so happens to be Lady GaGa's keyboard player. Featuring 294 keys, complete with three contiguous 88-note keyboards, a single 30-note control section and 3 pitch bend/mod per full keyboard section. Click here to view the first image in this week's geek life gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a normal day in Russia for one guy, despite masked men invading the restaurant he's in.

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Nintendo NES Guitar

Many stringed instruments are crafted from the finest wood, but sometimes, geeks go the extra length to make something unique. For example, this person took an old Nintendo Entertainment System, gutted the machine, and transformed it into a fully-functional guitar. On a related note, did you know that the NES had the first cross-shaped diretional pad on a game console? That's right, Gunpei Yokoi, inventor of the Game Boy, was behind this invention, which was originally designed for a handheld version of Donkey Kong. Continue reading for more.

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Yabahar

When you first hear this instrument, a digital synthesizer might come to mind, but believe it or not, there is no electricity involved. It's called the Yaybahar, and this new acoustic instrument - designed by Istanbul-based musician Gorkem Sen - can be played many different ways: using mallets, a bow, or relying on a combination of two drum-like membranes, along with long springs, and a tall fretted neck, to create sweet digital-sounding music. Continue reading for another video.

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Extended Album Covers

Photo credit: Aptitude

Web design studio Aptitude has always wondered what existed beyond the edges of a music album cover. So, they created a series called "The Bigger Picture", which started with very well-known imagery and then imagined what might be taking place beyond the square frames. Here's what Aptitude has to say: "In this digital age, buying an album has become less about buying a physical package to buying a digital version out of convenience. So in honor of a once coveted industry standard, we take a look at some of the most iconic album covers over the years and put our own spin on them by revealing 'the bigger picture.'" Continue reading for more.

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Cat Ear Headphones

Photo credit: Axent Wear

Wenqing Yan and Victoria Hu are both fans of high-tech music gadgets. So, they went ahead and created these nifty cat ear-inspired headphones, complete with external cat ear speakers, LED lights, detachable cord, plush ear cushioning and rechargeable batteries to boot. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a first look at Disney's Tomorrowland.

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Hammock Festival

Festivals, such as Coachella, can be exciting to attend, but it's definitely nothing like the International Highline Meeting in Monte Piana. Highline Meeting brings together the world's most extreme slackliners. Approximately 18 highlines are set up, ranging from 18 feet high to more than 300 feet off the ground. For those not afraid of heights, a mere $40 gets you a place at one of the most dangerous napping places in the world. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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The Music Hotel

Photo credit: Distractify

There's no shortage of luxury hotels in Berlin, Germany, but there's one that stands out from the crowd: The Music Hotel. Art director Olivier Nowak teamed up with designer Karim Rashid and architect Sergei Tchoban to come up with the concept you see above. The hotel is aimed at touring and traveling musicians, replacing regular signs as well as menus with cleverly-placed popular lyrics throughout. Click here to view the first image in this week's geek life gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of IKEA's mind-blowing BookBook, set to take on Apple and Samsung.

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Richard Dunn, a Canadian man who is now living in the States, agreed to getting bumped off of two flights out of Las Vegas' McCarran Airport and then this Celine Dion music video ensued, which has received 4.4 million plus views in just a few days. How did he get the inspiration? Well, Dunn Googled songs about loneliness and came up with "All by Myself" and the night cleaners didn't bat an eyelash to boot. Continue reading to watch.

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Michael Jackson left the world in June 200, but his music is still reaching fans worldwide, and on Sunday night at the Billboard Music Awards 2014, a hologram of the late King Of Pop surprised everyone in attendance. The amazingly realistic hologram performed Slave To The Rhythm and even moonwalked across the stage. Continue reading for the video and more information.

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