tech e blog

SNES 1996

Photo credit: Sketchbreaker / Reddit

If you were around for the launch of the SNES back in 1991, the $199 bundle with Super Mario World may sound familiar. Fast forward to 1996, gamers could pick up a Killer Instinct console bundle for a mere $79.99, or a single Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie's Double Trouble game for a whopping $69.99. That's right, for just $10 more, one could have the console + game, instead of just the latter. The bright side is that most other games ranged in price from $29.99 - $34.99 at the time. Click here to view the first image in this week's things that looks like each other gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of the Navy's Force Awakens trailer spoof.

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Game Boy 1UP

If Nintendo were to put a modern twist on the Game Boy, it'd probably look like the 1UP, by German designer Florian Renner. Think of it as a cross between a Game Boy Advance and Wii U. The portable console itself would be constructed from injection-molded plastic reinforced with natural fiber, complete with game cartridge slot. Continue reading for a picture of the Fallout 4 version.

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Hardest Mario Maker Levels

Super Mario Maker is basically the end all for any fans of the famous plumber, as it lets you create and upload custom levels for the world to enjoy. You read that right, [layers may create and play their own custom levels based on Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 3, Super Mario World, and New Super Mario Bros. U and share them online. Over time, new editing tools are unlocked, allowing players to download and play levels designed by other players. In addition to traditional Mario elements such as Goombas, warp pipes, and power ups, players are able to manipulate the behavior of various elements in unique ways. For example, they can stack enemies, have hazards come out of question blocks and warp pipes, use shells as protective helmets, and make cannons and Lakitu emit any chosen objects. These combinations are possible because editing tools in the game work in tandem with one another. This allows players to enlarge an enemy by giving it a mushroom, grant an enemy the ability to fly by giving it wings, combine different attributes, and more Continue reading to see some of the hardest custom levels to date.

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Super Nintendo Super Advantage

A number of accessories were produced for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Many of these devices were modeled after earlier add-ons for the NES: the Super Scope is a light gun functionally similar to the NES Zapper (though the Super Scope features wireless capabilities) and the Super Advantage is an arcade-style joystick with adjustable turbo settings akin to the NES Advantage. This ad from the 90s shows just how bold Nintendo was with their advertising. Continue reading for more classic video game ads.

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Pokemon Gym Japan

Photo credit: Kotaku

In the Pokemon games, the Gym is where players go to train their Pocket Monsters, and the Pokemon Expo Gym is where you can shop and interact with Pokemon. Now, there's a real-life Pokemon Expo Gym in Osaka, Japan, which is similar to Pokemon Center stores in that it offers a whole host of things to buy, along with real exhibits in which you can interact and talk with monsters. Interactive areas include: Charzard's Battle Colosuem, Zoroark's Somewhat Sinister Dojo, Machamp's First Aid Center, Pokemon Battle Bowling, and more. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny Facebook status updates gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a nightmare fuel father and daughter costume duo.

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Sharp Famicom Titler Nintendo

Photo credit: Kotaku

The Famicom Titler is basically a Nintendo-licensed Famicom-compatible device produced by the Sharp Corporation, and first released in 1989 exclusively in Japan at a retail price of 43,000 yen ($356). The system was the only consumer-level Famicom to internally generate RGB video, the only Famicom system with S-Video output, and it has been noted for its crisp clarity of image. The system also functioned as a subtitle-generator and it could be used in combination with a RF-video camera to create gameplay videos and demos. Continue reading for two more videos and additional information.

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NES World Championship Cart

The Nintendo Entertainment System was released in North America on October 18, 1985, and it celebrated its 30th anniversary yesterday. Unfortunately, many Nintendo fans today aren't too familiar with the system, especially the NES World Championships cartridges (above). The NWC competition was based on a custom NES cartridge by the same name. Approximately 90-copies of the gray version exist, which were given to finalists after the championships concluded. Another twenty-six copies exist in gold, like the The Legend of Zelda cartridge, and were given as prizes in a separate contest held by Nintendo Power magazine, making it the rarest and most valuable NES cartridge ever released, with a few pristine examples fetching $15,000 online. Continue reading for more cool facts.

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Custom Portable N64

N64 fan and video game modder Travis Breen has built an aluminum unibody portable N64 that looks to be something straight from an Apple Store. "Latest version of EverDrive OS 2.01 now features Gameshark cheat support. Contrary to popular belief the EverDrive is capable of playing Banjo-Tooie without manual patching. Some unreleased titles such as 40 Winks and Goldeneye X plays flawlessly on the EverDrive," said Breen. Continue reading for more funny things only Nintendo 64 fanatics will remember.

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FreezerBoy Game Boy Magnets

FreezerBoy is perfect for gamers who've always wanted a giant Game Boy, as it's basically a set of 6 removable (dry-erase friendly) magnets that not only work on fridges, but other home appliances as well. In related news, did you know that Nintendo's Game Boy is the company's second handheld system following the Game & Watch series, which was introduced in 1980? It combined features from both the Nintendo Entertainment System and Game & Watch, originally bundled with the puzzle game Tetris. Get a set here now.

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NES Cartridge Hard Drive Mod

Photo credit: Cheesey24 / Imgur

Repurposing an old game cartridge isn't something new, but this is one of the first projects we've seen with a custom label. Imgur user "cheesey24" started with an old hard drive and a Championship Bowling cartridge, but gutting the latter wasn't the easiest of tasks. Since Nintendo uses custom screws, he had to make his own tool - using an old runner from a model kit and a lighter to mold it - before cracking open the case. After some dremeling, a custom label from UnconventionalHacker and securing the hard drive, the rest is history. Continue reading to see the project from start to finish.

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