tech e blog

Cyborg Beetle

Dr. Hirotaka Sato, an aerospace engineer at Nanyang Technological University, and his team, have managed to turn live beetles into cyborgs by electrically controlling their motor functions. Simply put, the researchers wired the insects so that they could be controlled by a switchboard after countless hours of research on their neural networks. This means they can manipulate the different walking gaits, speeds, flying direction, and other forms of motion, thus becoming robots of sorts. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny Facebook status updates gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of baby Groot in a new Guardians of the Galaxy 2 teaser.

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Animatronic Dinosaur Dino-A-Live

We're at least decades away from a real-life Jurassic Park, if ever, but that hasn't stopped a Japanese company ON-ART Corp. from envisioning an animatronic dinosaur park called Dino-A-Live where visitors can see realistic dinosaur replicas live. Guests who attended a recent performance at a hotel were greeted by full-sized dinosaur robots, which included a 26-foot tall Tyrannosaurus rex, along with an allosaurus and raptors. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of the best DIY fire tornado.

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Autonomous RoboRace

Many auto and robotics enthusiasts already know that Roborace will be a motorsport championship with autonomously driving, electrically powered vehicles, held on the same tracks as the Formula E championship season. This will be the first global championship for driverless cars, and "DevBot #1" managed to complete 12 laps around a track without crashing. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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Infineon Rubik's Cube Machine

Most would consider solving a Rubik's Cube in minutes to be impossible, but Infineon Technologies engineer Albert Beer has manged to create a robot that set a new world record by taking just 0.637-seconds to complete the puzzle. "It takes tremendous computing power to solve such a highly complex puzzle with a machine. In the case of 'Sub1 Reloaded', the power for motor control was supplied by a microcontroller from Infineon's AURIX family, similar to the one used in driver assistance systems. Minimal reaction times play an even greater role in autonomous driving. A high data-processing rate is necessary to ensure real-time capabilities with clock frequencies of 200 MHz. As a result of this ability, a vehicle can safely and reliably apply the brakes when it approaches a barrier," said Beer. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one showing how to fix a fire with a broken lighter.

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Kobi Robot

If money is no object, why cut grass or shovel snow manually, when you could get Kobi to do it? That's right, this autonomous robot can not only keep your lawn mowed during the warmer months, including using weather forecasts to know when to cut and mulching the clippings to keep your yard healthy, but a separate modules enable it to clear both your yard and driveway of leaves, as well as snow. It's powered by near-silent brushless motors and runs off a lithium-ion battery, which lets it automatically return to its charging station when it's running low on power. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny autocorrect texts gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of Ghostbusters outtakes you probably haven't seen before.

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BMW Transformer

Over the years, we've seen plenty of computer-rendered transforming robots, whether it be cell phones or cars, but now, Turkish company Letron might have just created the real deal. They took a real BMW E90 3-Series car, took apart the body, and created a giant robot that can be remotely controlled. Apparently, they have plans to create more versions, using different bodies. Click here for more pictures of the build process. Continue reading for a video of an earlier transforming prototype.

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TAF20 Fire-Fighting Robot

When fires get too dangerous, you need a machine like TAF20 to step in. This beastly machine sports an extinguishing turbine mounted on a compact crawler vehicle. The turbine is fitted with a nozzle ring that atomizes water and extinguishing foam to form fine particulate matter, distributed by a propeller. To keep firefighters safe, the robot can be remotely controlled from a distance up to 500-meters. It also features a fan to clear smoke and a bulldozer blade that can move aside large obstacles, such as building debris, making navigation through dangerous zones much easier. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one showing a shock wave caused by a 10,000-pound underwater explosive test.

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Gone are the days it takes months to build a home, thanks to the all-new Hadrian X robot. This truck-mounted building machine can lay up to 1,000 bricks per hour using a 30m boom, all the while gluing them into place and working 24 hours day. All this equates to a fully built home in just 2-days, or at least the exterior structure. "By utilizing a construction adhesive rather that traditional mortar, the Hadrian X will maximize the speed of the build and strength and thermal efficiency of the final structure," said the Australian firm. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of an awesome indoor tornado machine.

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Disney Research VertiGo Wall-Climbing Robot

Take Spider-Man's wall-climbing abilities, put it in robot form, and you get Disney Research's VertiGo. Using two tiltable propellers, this four-wheeled robot can easily transition from horizontal movement to vertical climbing. That's right, its dual, maneuverable propellers give the VertiGo its thrust, while one pair of wheels provides steering capabilities. The horizontal to vertical transition is achieved when the rear propeller pushes the robot forward while the front propeller thrusts upward, flipping it up a wall. Once on the wall, the force of air created by the propellers presses the robot firmly against the surface, preventing it from falling off, while slightly tilting the propellers can give it either forwards or backwards thrust. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one experiment showing what happens when you pour boiling water into liquid nitrogen.

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Hajime 13-Foot Robot Crawl Inside

Osaka-based Hajime Research Institute could have unknowingly started the Gundam program by building a giant 13-foot tall, 660-pound robot that humans control from the inside. The ultimate goal is to one day build a walking, human-controlled robot that stands 59-feet high. The control system of this prototype is based on a master-slave system, which is essentially just a smaller version of the robot inside that can be manipulated - turning its head with a small twist of the model's, etc. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny autocorrect texts gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of an 80s game that might've been designed by the CIA for mind control purposes.

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