tech e blog

BMW Transformer

Over the years, we've seen plenty of computer-rendered transforming robots, whether it be cell phones or cars, but now, Turkish company Letron might have just created the real deal. They took a real BMW E90 3-Series car, took apart the body, and created a giant robot that can be remotely controlled. Apparently, they have plans to create more versions, using different bodies. Click here for more pictures of the build process. Continue reading for a video of an earlier transforming prototype.

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TAF20 Fire-Fighting Robot

When fires get too dangerous, you need a machine like TAF20 to step in. This beastly machine sports an extinguishing turbine mounted on a compact crawler vehicle. The turbine is fitted with a nozzle ring that atomizes water and extinguishing foam to form fine particulate matter, distributed by a propeller. To keep firefighters safe, the robot can be remotely controlled from a distance up to 500-meters. It also features a fan to clear smoke and a bulldozer blade that can move aside large obstacles, such as building debris, making navigation through dangerous zones much easier. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one showing a shock wave caused by a 10,000-pound underwater explosive test.

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Gone are the days it takes months to build a home, thanks to the all-new Hadrian X robot. This truck-mounted building machine can lay up to 1,000 bricks per hour using a 30m boom, all the while gluing them into place and working 24 hours day. All this equates to a fully built home in just 2-days, or at least the exterior structure. "By utilizing a construction adhesive rather that traditional mortar, the Hadrian X will maximize the speed of the build and strength and thermal efficiency of the final structure," said the Australian firm. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of an awesome indoor tornado machine.

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Disney Research VertiGo Wall-Climbing Robot

Take Spider-Man's wall-climbing abilities, put it in robot form, and you get Disney Research's VertiGo. Using two tiltable propellers, this four-wheeled robot can easily transition from horizontal movement to vertical climbing. That's right, its dual, maneuverable propellers give the VertiGo its thrust, while one pair of wheels provides steering capabilities. The horizontal to vertical transition is achieved when the rear propeller pushes the robot forward while the front propeller thrusts upward, flipping it up a wall. Once on the wall, the force of air created by the propellers presses the robot firmly against the surface, preventing it from falling off, while slightly tilting the propellers can give it either forwards or backwards thrust. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one experiment showing what happens when you pour boiling water into liquid nitrogen.

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Hajime 13-Foot Robot Crawl Inside

Osaka-based Hajime Research Institute could have unknowingly started the Gundam program by building a giant 13-foot tall, 660-pound robot that humans control from the inside. The ultimate goal is to one day build a walking, human-controlled robot that stands 59-feet high. The control system of this prototype is based on a master-slave system, which is essentially just a smaller version of the robot inside that can be manipulated - turning its head with a small twist of the model's, etc. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny autocorrect texts gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of an 80s game that might've been designed by the CIA for mind control purposes.

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3D-Printed Robot

The octopus is a fascinating creature, known as escape artists of the sea, capable of squeezing themselves into just about any space. Harvard researchers managed to create Octobot, the world's first completely soft-bodied robot, with a silicone exterior. Instead of batteries or wires, it uses a small reservoir of hydrogen peroxide as fuel. When this chemical washes over the flecks of platinum embedded within the robot, it results in a chemical reaction that produces gas to inflate and flex its arms. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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MAARS Robot Military

MAARS (Modular Advanced Armed Robotic System) is no ordinary robot, as it was designed to be an indestructible unmanned ground vehicle for reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition military missions. In addition to an M249 saw machine gun, it comes equipped with an M24OB machine gun, quad M2O3 grenade launchers, and up to 400-rounds of ammunition. It can keep eyes on the entire battlefield, thanks to 360° cameras, two-way communication, night + thermal visions, and of course, lasers technology. This is definitely one machine that enemies do not want to mess with, and the entire system can be operated remotely by a human for added safety. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of a mysterious glowing blue fireball in Russia.

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Boston Dynamics Atlas


It's only a matter of time until we robots walk among us on the street, but for this dog walker, spotting Boston Dynamics' 5'9" tall Atlas humanoid robot in the woods was definitely unexpected. This machine includes 28 hydraulically-actuated degrees of freedom, two hands, arms, legs, feet and a torso. It was designed to negotiate outdoor, rough terrain. Atlas can walk bipedally leaving the upper limbs free to lift, carry, and manipulate the environment. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular virala videos today, including one of video game records that will never be broken.

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SpotMini

Google-owned Boston Dynamics has unveiled SpotMini, a smaller version of the Spot robot. Weighing 55-pounds (65-pounds if you include its arm), it's all-electric (no hydraulics) and can run for 90-minutes on a single charge, depending on the task(s). It boasts a variety of sensors, including depth cameras, a solid state gyro (IMU) and proprioception sensors in the limbs, which help with navigation and mobile manipulation. Continue reading for the full demo video and more information.

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DARPA Prosthetic Arm

Unlike other prosthetics, DARPA's robotic arm is connected directly to the user's motor cortex - the part that controls muscle movement - and sensory cortex - used to identify tactile sensations when you touch things. The wires from the motor cortex enable the wearer to control the motion of the arm, and pressure sensors that loop back into the sensory cortex are used for the touch sensation. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one showing just how crazy the new Superman virtual reality roller coaster really is.

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