tech e blog

At first glance, this may look like a prop for an upcoming Star Wars movie, but it's actually the MorpHex II, which was created by Norwegian Engineer Kare Halvorsen. This updated version not only has the ability to transform from a ball to a robot, but it's also to roll about while in sphere form. To accomplish this, the six-legged robot uses the motors on one side of its body to push itself along while contracted into a ball. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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German researchers at Festo have unveiled a new robotic kangaroo that mimics the movements of its real-life counterpart. It's officially called the "BionicKangaroo", and is capable of making stabilized jumps via a gesture-based remote control. That's not all, this kangaroo also replicates the animal's natural ability of storing energy between jumps. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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It's official, Cubestormer 3 has smashed the Guinness World Record for solving a Rubik's Cube in the fastest time by solving a cube in just 3.253 seconds at the Big Bang Fair, held at the NEC in Birmingham. This third-generation model beat the previous non-human record of 5.27 seconds, set by the machine's predecessor, the Cubestormer 2. Continue reading for two videos and more information.

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Photo credit: Inhabitat

Researchers at Harvard have unveiled a tiny mechanized bee called the MoBee, which utilizes new technology that produces self-assembling three dimensional machines from flat sets of components. It's assembled using layers of differing materials on an assembly scaffold - think pop-up book. Once it's free from the scaffold, it becomes an autonomous, ridged 3-D object whose wings flap when electrical current is applied. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of the new Captain America: Winter Soldier trailer.

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At $1-million, the Kuratas combat robot can be controlled by motion sensor technology in the one-man cockpit or through any phone with a 3G or faster data connection. Plus, the robot's heavy artillery weapons system fires 6,000 bullet per minute. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of Kuratas.

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By combining a Nintendo Power Glove with 3D-printed parts, Easton LaChappelle has created a functional robotic prosthetic arm. Other items used include: LEGO bricks, fishing wire, and surgical tubing. His design utilizes 3D printing to help offset the high costs of prosthetic technology, and is controlled by a Teensy Arduini microcontroller, amplifier circuits and Bluetooth receivers. Continue reading for two videos and more information.

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We have seen the future of toys, and it may look something like 20-year-old Drake Anthony's "Death Ray Laser Drone Bot". Simply put, by removing the top of the robot and tweaking the firing mechanism, Anthony was able to replace the foam thrower with a 2W blue laser diode. He connected the laser to existing wires, which allows him to move the Attacknid using the robot's remote control. It can walk, spin the lasers 360-degrees, and fire the laser at targets. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Here's an awesome look at Cubli, a robotic cube that can jump up, balance itself on a corner or edge, and even walk around by flipping over its edge. It was developed by researchers at ETH Zurich's Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control and relies on three spinning motors to get it going that will spin faster, slower or stop to help maintain its balance or continue the flipping motion. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed robotic muscles that are 1,000 times stronger than those of an average human. These muscles utilize the rare properties of vanadium dioxide, a compound that changes from an insulator to a conductive metal at 67 degrees Celsius. This transition process "yields an incredible amount of strength," says Dvice. Berkeley Labs reports that their robotic muscles are "...able to catapult objects 50 times heavier than itself over a distance five times its length within 60 milliseconds - faster than the blink of an eye." Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Standing 6-feet tall and weighing 275-pounds, NASA's anime-inspired Valkyrie superhero robot features a series of cameras, sonar, and other sensors spread across its body for collision / object detection while walking. The robot can be operated by someone with limited robotics experience, thanks to its modular design, allowing for someone to replace body parts in just minutes. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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