tech e blog

Nestle Smart Food

Nestle announced that it's developing 'exercise in a bottle', or to be more specific, a drink or pill that burns fat the same way exercise does. Scientists at the company's Geneva headquarters say they've found how an enzyme in charge of regulating metabolism can be stimulated by a compound called C13. Kei Sakamoto, the lead scientist on diabetes and circadian rhythms at Nestle, researched how the master regulator of the body's metabolism, an enzyme called AMPK, is controlled at the molecular level. He says, "Ideally, we'll be able to develop products that will help promote and augment the effects of exercise." Continue reading for more information.

Continue Reading


Supermassive Black Hole

Like many have seen in Christopher Nolan's Interstellar black holes are both frightening and fascinating at the same time. Scientists reported that they have discovered supermassive black holes - aka quasars - are actually aligned with each other over distances stretching billions of light-years. These observations were made with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. A quasar is a compact region in the center of a massive galaxy, that surrounds its central supermassive black hole. Its size is 10-10,000 times the Schwarzschild radius of the black hole. The energy emitted by a quasar derives from mass falling onto the accretion disc around the black hole. Continue reading for a video and more information.

Continue Reading


Vetigel Blood

Invented by former NYU student and now Suneris CEO Joe Landolina, VetiGel stops bleeding almost instantly with a two-part process: first is a plant-based hemophilic polymer that grabs onto the blood and 'snaps it back together to seal the wound'; next is a polymer then replicates the skin tricking the body into thinking it is skin. Landolina says, "We extract pieces of the cell walls out of the plant, kind of like LEGO blocks. When applied to a wound, these LEGO blocks reassemble with whatever you put them next to." Continue reading for a more detailed video and additional information.

Continue Reading


Japan Maglev Train

The Central Japan Railway Company used a new Shinkansen maglev train to transport passengers along an 18 km (11 mi) piece of track at up to 500 km/h (311 mph) during a test run. Japan's bullet trains typically travel at speeds of 320 km/h (200 mph), but the levitating Shinkansen uses the force of electromagnets for even faster speeds and to hover above the track. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny internet trolls gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of grandmas smoking cannabis for the first time.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo


Transparent Flower

The Diphylleia grayi looks like a normal flower when the sun is out, but its white petals turn transparent when they make contact with water. When it starts sprinkling, the petals turn clear as glass, which have caused some to give it the nickname of "skeleton flower." They're mainly found in the colder wooded mountainsides in Japan and China come late spring, recognizable by its large umbrella-like leaves and small clusters of pearly white blossoms. Continue reading for more images.

Continue Reading


Ultimate Home Flight Simulator

Igor Pernet, a 53-year-old aviation enthusiast has always wanted to become a commercial airline pilot, but his life didn't go quite as planned. So, he did the next best thing...buying a decommissioned Cyprus Airways plane and turning the cockpit into the ultimate home flight simulator, complete with all controls and wraparound projection display. This project took him 2.5-years to complete, but as you can see, it was well worth the effort. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of Far Cry 4 in real-life.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo


Earth from Mars

Photo credit: Keith Ranville

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second smallest planet in the Solar System, after Mercury. It's named after the Roman god of war, and often called the "Red Planet" because of the iron oxide prevalent on its surface, which gives it a reddish appearance. Now if you were to view Earth from Mars, you'd probably only see a small white dot. Continue reading for more fascinating images showing just how insignificant we really are in this universe.

Continue Reading


Uranus Storm

Researchers based out of the University of California, Berkeley used the world's two most powerful telescopes, the Keck Observatory in Hawaii and the Hubble Space Telescope, to spot unusually bright cloud activity in the upper atmosphere of Uranus, the seventh planet from the sun, which lies about 1.86 billion miles away. The team spotted approximately 8 storms in the planet's northern hemisphere over a span of just two days in August. There was one storm in particular that is now considered the brightest ever seen there, accounting for 30% of all the reflected light we can see coming off the planet. Continue reading for a more detailed video on Uranus and additional information about the mega storms.

Continue Reading


Growing Nails Instead of Hair

Back in 2009, Shanyna Isom was just a normal law student at the University of Memphis. One asthma attack later, and her life changed forever. You see, a hospital visit ended up causing a mystery illness so inconceivably strange that even after 5-years of research, doctors still have no how to treat her properly. According to the physicians treating her at the Johns Hopkins Medical Center, in Baltimore, Isom is the only person in the world with this condition. One doctor pinpoints it to an allergic reaction to anti-inflammatory steroids that were given during her asthma treatment. Continue reading to see what she looks like today and for more information.

Continue Reading


Glow in the Dark Bike Path

Eindhoven, a city in The Netherlands, now boasts the world's first solar-powered, glow-in-the-dark bicycle path. Called, the "Van Gogh-Roosegaarde cycle path", it was designed by Daan Roosegaarde, constructed by Heijmans, and is illuminated by thousands of twinkling stones and was inspired by the world-famous painting, Starry Night. It marks the start of the Van Gogh 2015 international theme year. Continue reading for a video, more pictures and additional information.

Continue Reading