tech e blog

2000 Year Old Sarcophagus

Photo credit: Mohamed Abd El Ghany via Bored Panda

Finally, a 2,000-year-old sarcophagus has been opened in Egypt, and it's nothing worthy of a movie. That's right, Egyptian archaeologists pried open the 30-ton black granite coffin, the largest yet found in Alexandria, and found the remains of a family of three "We found the bones of three people, in what looks like a family burial. We've opened it and, thank God, the world has not fallen into darkness. I was the first to put my whole head inside the sarcophagus...and here I stand before you. I am fine," said Mostafa Waziri, secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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MIT AlterEgo Surf Internet Mind

MIT graduate student Arnav Kapur has developed "AlterEgo," a head-worn device that works when the user internally vocalizes a specific command or question. Electrical signals that your brain normally sends to the vocal cords are then intercepted and sent to a computer, which communicates with the user's inner ear through vibrations. No word yet on if this technology will eventually be commercialized. Click here for the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of the most expensive machines in the world.

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Bioluminescent Plankton

Photo credit: Kris Williams via Peta Pixel

Photographer Kris Williams happened to be on the shores of Wales and captured a stunning, yet natural, phenomenon known as bioluminescence. Plankton may use bioluminescence for defense against predators by illuminating themselves when they detect a predator, possibly making the predator itself more vulnerable by attracting the attention of predators from higher trophic levels. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Toyota Energy Observer Hydrogen Ship

Toyota's Energy Observer is touted as the "world first hydrogen-powered ship," and it measures over 100 feet long, 42 feet wide, and displaces 28 metric tons. It was launched in France last year on a six-year mission to test propulsion from renewable sources, and currently, it's in the Mediterranean, heading towards Northern Europe next year, with the final leg being Tokyo, just in time for the 2020 Olympics. Continue reading for a more detailed video tour and more information.

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X-Ray Photo Restoration

Photo credit: Madalena Kozachuk / Western University via Peta Pixel

University of Western Ontario researchers, led by Madalena Kozachu, managed to use synchrotron X-ray beams and fluorescence imaging to restore 19th-century daguerreotype plates - basically iodine-sensitized silver-coated copper plates developed using heated mercury vapor. The original photos faded over time due to years of tarnish build up, but the mercury particles still remain. Using the new X-ray imaging and scanning process that takes 8 hours per plate, the mercury distributed on each plate can be isolated, thus recovering the original photos even when you can't see them with your eyes. Continue reading for another example and more information.

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E-Dermis Prosthetic

Photo credit: Daily Mail

A John Hopkins biomedical engineer, Luke Osborn, may be able to give the sense of touch and pain back to amputees, thanks to an electronic "skin" called an e-dermis that provides vital sensory information that could protect the prosthetic and the wearer. A thin layer of rubber and fabric slides over the fingertips of a prosthetic hand, which is hooked up to a small computer attached to the upper arm. When the skin touches an object, an electrical signal is sent to electrodes attached to the end of the stump that stimulate nerves in the arm. These bursts simulate nerve pulses, thus triggering a pain or touch response in the brain. Click here for the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one showing what super glue does in borax.

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Wireless Power Room


Forget chargers, Disney Research has developed a wireless power room that can transmit data through the air. That's right, quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR) can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. In their experimental demonstration, a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Click here for the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular videos today, including one of someone unboxing a sealed iPhone 3G.

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Norman AI

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have managed to train an artificial intelligence algorithm, called "Norman", to become a psychopath by exposing it to gruesome or violent images posted on Reddit. Named after the Anthony Perkins character in Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 classic "Psycho", this AI was trained to perform image captioning, a popular deep learning method of generating a textual description of an image, but the twist was only exposing it to gruesome and violent images from a subreddit dedicated to documenting and observing the disturbing reality of death. Rorsach inkblots were then used to compare Norman to other AI which hadn't been exposed to the same gruesome images. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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Google Project Oasis

Google has quietly revealed "Project Oasis," an AI-powered terrarium called that works with Google Assistant to gather weather data from around the world and realistically simulate those conditions within the device. For example, if it's raining in New York City, water will start dropping in the terrarium. Best of all, programmers can build their own terrarium using the official Project Oasis Github page. Continue reading for a video of it in-action.

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Solar Scorcher Dry Ice

Grant Thompson, also known as "King of Random" on YouTube, created a 2000° F solar scorcher years back, and just recently, he decided to see what would happen if he used his homemade contraption on a block of dry ice. Just for reference, this solar cooker can easily melt pennies, lead, and even a plate of steel. All of those items were placed on the block of dry ice, and the results are quite surprising to say the least. Click here for the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one about why Nintendo's Virtual Boy was an epic failure.

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