tech e blog

Laser Beam Flight Path

For the first time in history, scientists have captured footage of a laser beam's flight path using an ultra-high-speed camera capable of detecting single particles of light. Scottish researchers recorded 2-million laser pulses over a 10 minute period, as individual photons collided with the air. Normally, scientists can only see light when it reflects off other objects, or when smoke gas is blown over it. Continue reading for the video and more information.

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NYC Subway Car Reef

New York City's subway system is currently the world's sixth busiest, with 1.6-billion annual passenger rides. This means that old subways cars are constantly being replaced with new ones. You might think that the last stop for these old trains would be at some junkyard, but photographer Stephen Mallon tracked the to their watery graves at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, where they basically act as artificial reefs. Continue reading for a rare video look, more pictures and additional information.

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BLK Water Black

BLK water may not look like something you'd want to rehydrate with, but believe it or not, this spring water is fully safe to drink, despite its appearance. It's essentially Canadian spring water that has been infused with fulvic acid - a natural nutrient-rich compound that has been used in alternative therapies for centuries. Fulvic acid has been called a "miracle molecule" in recent times for its detoxifying properties, mainly its ability to bind to metals. Product page. Continue reading for a video review of the flavored version and more information.

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Romanesque Cauliflower

Photo credit: Razultull / Reddit

No, this isn't a planet from another planet, just the Romanesque Cauliflower, an edible flower bud of the species Brassica oleracea. It was first documented in Italy, and light green in color. Romanesco has a striking appearance because its form is a natural approximation of a fractal. When compared to a traditional cauliflower, as a vegetable its texture is far more crunchy, and its flavor is not as assertive, being delicate and nutty. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Adam Rainer Dwarf Giant

Adam Rainer, born in 1899 in Graz, Austria-Hungary, is currently the only person in recorded history to have been both a dwarf and a giant. At the age of 18 (1917), he was measured at 4 ft 0.25 in. Then, likely as a result of a pituitary tumor, he had a dramatic growth spurt in 1931, reaching 7 ft 2 in. As a result of his gigantism he became bedridden for the rest of his life. When he died in 1950 he had reached a height of 7 ft 8 in. He weighed 241-pounds. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Bioluminescent Water

Photo credit: Kin Cheung via Laughing Squid

Water is usually dark and ominous at night, but a bloom of Noctiluca scintillans, a large, green marine dinoflagellate that exhibits bioluminescence when disturbed, made its way to Hong Kong. According to University of Georgia oceanographer Samantha Joye, this phenomenon, also known as "Sea Sparkle", is triggered by farm pollution that can be devastating to marine life and local fisheries. Eugene Turner at Louisiana State University says that Noctiluca itself does not produce neurotoxins like other similar organisms do, but its role as both prey and predator can eventually magnify the accumulation of toxins in the food chain. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading to watch the top five viral videos for today.

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Ice Drill

Researchers in Antarctica used heavy machinery to drill into 2,400-feet of solid ice, but at those depths, you wouldn't expect to find any living animals, like fish, right? That's exactly what they discovered. Scientific American says: "People in the cargo container stared at an image of the sea floor panned out on one of the video monitors, captured by the forward-looking camera. Then someone started to yell and point. All eyes swung to the screen with the down-looking camera. A graceful, undulating shadow glided across its view, tapered front to back like an exclamation point - the shadow cast by a bulb-eyed fish. Then people saw the creature casting that shadow: bluish-brownish-pinkish, as long as a butter knife, its internal organs showing through its translucent body." Continue reading to see the fish and a strange shrimp they found.

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Blind Man Sees Again

Mark Cornell, who became legally blind after serving in the US Air Force, was able to see for the first time in 20-years, thanks to a pair of high-tech eSight electronic glasses. This $15,000 device uses a camera and advanced computing to create real-time video that can be enhanced / magnified for people suffering from vision impairment. Continue reading for the touching video and more information.

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Spider Tailed Horned Viper

What could be creepier than a normal viper? A viper with a tail that mimics a real spider. This species of viper endemic is fortunately only found in western Iran. The specific name, urarachnoides refers to this snake's spider-like tail tip, as does the common name, spider-tailed horned viper. It was known since the 1960s, but the one specimen's tail was dismissed as a tumor or deformity. Continue reading for another video and more pictures.

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Super Hydrophobic Metal

Thanks to some extremely high-power laser beams, University of Rochester researchers have developed a super-hydrophobic metal that are comprised of micro and nanostructures to keep their surfaces clean and dry. Practical uses include: preventing icing / rust and collecting heat more effectively as well as water-repelling electronics. Utilizing powerful 65-femtosecond laser pulses at a rate of up to 1000 per second, they were able to change the surface structure of platinum, titanium and brass samples. Continue reading for two videos, more pictures and additional information.

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