tech e blog

Juno Probe

NASA's Juno Probe is a solar-powered spacecraft has finally reached Jupiter after 5-years and 1.8-billion miles. It fired its main rocket engine at 11:18pm ET, and quickly slowed from 165,000 mph into a sweeping orbit around the planet. The Juno spacecraft's suite of science instruments will determine the ratio of oxygen to hydrogen, effectively measuring the abundance of water in Jupiter, which will help distinguish among prevailing theories linking Jupiter's formation to the Solar System. Continue reading for another video and more information. Click here to view a few bonus images of Jupiter.

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Solar Road Route 66

Solar Roadways have already been installed on roads in the Netherlands, but now, they're hitting the historic Route 66 highway in Missouri. This stretch will consist of modular pieces covered in tempered glass, and inside, there are microprocessors that communicate with other panels, a control center, and cars driving on the road. They also come equipped with LED lights and heating elements to prevent snow buildup in the colder months. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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Omni-Directional Car Wheels

Inventor William Liddiard spent years creating a set of omni-directional wheels that can be fitted onto any car, enabling it to move in any direction and spin 360°, making parallel parking a breeze. "Unlike other omni-capable wheels, my wheels do not require the vehicle to be built around them. This is a world first bolt-on application for anything with wheels. They are stronger, faster, and more accurately controlled than prior art. They can take a beating. The tires can have the same build characteristics (siping, grooves, rubber compounds etc.) as regular tires. Now you can drive in all directions, and turn on the spot, when needed," said Liddiard. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of a space shuttle launch as seen from a plane.

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Hydrogen-Powered Drone

Most drones, or at least those designed for commercial use, need to be recharged after a 20-minute flight. This new hydrogen-powered drone, could spend up to 2-hours in the sky, and be refueled near instantly upon landing. This particular model was created by the research team at Intelligent Energy, who installed a hydrogen fuel cell, weight just 3.5-pounds (fuel included) onto a DJI Matrice 100 quadcopter. Click here to view the first image in this week's art of trolling gallery.. Continue reading for a viral video of a man evading police on the highway in a go-kart.

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Supersonic Submarine

Photo credit: Daily Mail

Penn State and US Navy researchers are developing a supersonic submarine using a technique called supercavitation, or in other words, enveloping a submerged vessel inside an air bubble to lessen water drag. Theoretically, a supercavitating vessel could hit 3,600mph underwater, enabling one to travel from Beijing, China to San Francisco in just 100-minutes. "Basically supercavitation is used to significantly reduce drag and increase the speed of bodies in water. However, sometimes these bodies can get locked into a pulsating mode," said Grant M. Skidmore, recent Penn State Ph.D. recipient in aerospace engineering. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one showing how to make an emergency spare key at home.

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X-Men Ice Man Blasters

Inventor Colin Furze is back at it again, and this time, he's created a palm-mounted liquid nitrogen blasters, turning you into Ice Man from X-Men, or so we'd like to think. Simply put, it consists of a "Cryopack", which is filled with LN2, connected to a palm dispenser that's activated at the flick of a wrist. He demonstrates his creation by freezing a plant, water and even a dummy's burned head. Continue reading for a "making of" video.

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AMZ Electric Race Car


There's a new electric race car, called "Grimsel", in the news, and it's not from Porsche, Tesla, BMW, etc., but rather a group of AMZ (Academic Motorsports Racing Zurich) students from Switzerland. It has set the new Guinness world record for the fastest electric vehicle, thanks to a 31-pound carbon-fiber moncoque that features an aluminum honeycomb core. The entire vehicle weighs in at just 370-pounds, with each wheel being powered by an in-hub, 50-horsepower electric motor developed by the students themselves. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of a group of rejected X-Men characters.

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Blue Wine

Spanish startup Giik teamed up with scientists from the University of the Basque Country and food researchers at Azti Tecnecalia to create the world's first blue wine. Why? They wanted "to shake things up a little and see what happens. To create something new. Something different." The wine itself consists of a blend of red and white grapes harvested from vinyards in La Rioja, Zaragoza, Leon and Castilla-La Mancha, while the bluish tint is from anthocyanin, a natural pigment in the grapes' skin, as well as indigo. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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World's Oldest Twinkie

Roughly 40-years-ago, in 1976, then chemistry teacher Roger Bennatti at George Stevens Academy, in Maine, opened a fresh Twinkie and placed it on top of the chalkboard for observation. Today, the experiment continues because mold refuses to grow on unofficially the world's oldest Twinkie. The recommended shelf-life of a Twinkie is 25 days, but this particular specimen has been sitting in a glass case for four decades while retaining its classic shape. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Meteorite Handgun

Cabot Guns took a real Gibeon meteorite that crashed on Earth approximately 4.5-billion years ago - discovered in Namibia - and turned it into a real firearm. "It hasn't been done before and that's the kind of thing that drives me. Meteor is rare, more so than terrestrial precious metals and I wanted to create a set of guns that were formed from a material that had intrinsic value," said Rob Bianchin, founder of Cabot Guns. Called the "Big Bang Pistol Set," the two handguns were created using X-rays, 3-D modeling, electron-beam welding, and EDM wire cutting. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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