tech e blog

Solar Eclipse Today

Here's a mind-boggling picture of Danny MacAskill performing bike tricks during the solar eclipse at the Quirrang on the Isle of Skye, Scotland on March 20, 2015. This amazing shot was created by "friend and photographer Rutger Pauw who came up with the idea after seeing that one of the best views would be on the rider's home soil, where 98% of the sun was at one point obscured," according to Twisted Sifter. Continue reading for more.

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Sugru

Sugru Sealer is essentially self-setting rubber, a sort of Play Doh-like moldable glue, that turns to silicone rubber when left overnight to set. It bonds to most wood, glass, plastics, metals, and just about any other everyday material. That's not all, it's also waterproof and can handle temperatures from as low as -50°C to +180°C. When cured, it's flexible rather than rigid, which means that you can repair things that need to be able to move like textiles, cables, or shoes. It's also electrically insulating. Product page. Continue reading for a video, more pictures and additional information.

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Intel Pentium III

Intel's Pentium III refers to Intel's 32-bit x86 desktop and mobile microprocessors based on the sixth-generation P6 microarchitecture introduced on February 26, 1999. Compared to its predecessor, the most notable differences were the addition of the SSE instruction set (to accelerate floating point and parallel calculations), and the introduction of a controversial serial number embedded in the chip during the manufacturing process. The first Pentium III variant was the Katmai (Intel product code 80525), which saw an increase of 2 million transistors over the Pentium II. Continue reading to see what the inside of a CPU circuit looks like under a microscope.

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Ice Hummock Candy

Photo credit: Alexey Trofimov

At first glance, this looks like a surreal frozen landscape that was either computer-generated or made in a movie studio, but they're real ice formations captured by Alexey Trofimov at Lake Baikal in southern Siberia. According to Alex: "These unique frozen formations are in fact called ice hummocks. The knolls are created in part by pressure that develops gradually and unevenly in the layer of ice that covers Lake Baikal in winter. The physical make-up and temperature of the ice sheet then also become imbalanced, and hence the hummocks form and rise above the frozen surface." Continue reading for more picures.

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WD-40 Uses

WD-40 is nothing new, but there are several other ways to use this petroleum-based formula, including using it to clean tiles. Simply spray it on tiles to remove spilled mascara, nail polish, paint and scuff marks from tile floors. This can also be used to help you wipe away grime from the grout lines - clean everything up with soapy water afterwards. Or, just spray on stainless steel sinks and scrub lightly to remove stains. Continue reading for more.

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Scientific Technological Breakthroughs

The world is an exciting place, filled with unknowns, but each year, we come up with some amazing scientific / technological breakthroughs that once seemed impossible. For example, StoreDot is a charging solution that can re-charge a mobile phone battery from empty to full in a mere 30-seconds. The company is currently working on a variant that should also be able to charge electric cars - such as the Tesla Model S and Nissan Leaf - in just three minutes. StoreDot says is working on reducing the size of the charger, with the production model being a small unit that costs double the price of an average charger, about £20. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading to watch the five most popular viral videos of today - including the first trailer for Pixel, a weird video game-themed movie starring Adam Sandler.

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Mysterious Flash Russia

A mysterious silent flash lit up the Russian night sky yesterday, and it has baffled researchers while sparking theories of extraterrestrial activity. Weather experts claim that the blue and white burst of light that illuminated Stavropol in southern Russia, is not a natural phenomenon, since it was not accompanied by any sound. Adding to the strangeness is the fact that the flash actually made the city's street lights briefly go out. Continue reading for the video and more information.

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Volcanic Lightning Storm

Marc Szeglat, a videographer based in Germany, managed to capture video of an extremely rare volcanic lightning storm in the plume of highly active volcano Sakurajima, located on the Japanese island of Kyushu. A study in the journal Science indicated that electrical charges are generated when rock fragments, ash, and ice particles in a volcanic plume collide and produce static charges, just as ice particles collide in regular thunderstorms. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny work pictures gallery. Continue reading for a viral video showing why you shouldn't skate home from the bar when drunk.

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Photosynthesis Table

What if all of your gadgets could be powered by plants? Introducing Biophotovoltaics' Moss Table. This creation demonstrates the potential of Bio-Photo-Voltaic (BPV) technology, or electricity generated from the electrons captured by conductive fibers inside the moss table. Technically speaking, this technology turns energy that would otherwise be wasted in the photosynthesis process, into power that can be put to use. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Beam Energy

Yes, Japanese scientists have successfully transmitted energy wirelessly, which is a key step to making solar power generation in space a possibility. The team at JAXA used microwaves to deliver 1.8 kilowatts of power - enough to run an electric kettle - through the air with pinpoint accuracy to a receiver 170-feet away. Continue reading for a video an more information.

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