tech e blog

Gallium Soda Can

Gallium, a lesser common element, doesn't sound or look all that exciting, but this liquid metal does have a few tricks up its quickly melting sleeve. At room temperature, it melts in your hand, and can even be used to make a gag spoon. However, when placed on a typical soda can, it quickly turns to mush because the aluminum on amalgamates with the Gallium. Get some here now. Click here to view the first image in this week's geek life gallery. Continue reading for a viral video explaining what silicone-based life could look like.

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Solar-Powered Pipe Water

At first, this may appear to be a cigar-shaped UFO, but it's actually a solar-powered pipe, designed by Khalili Engineers, that desalinates up to 1.5-billion gallons of ocean water each year. "Above, solar panels provide power to pump seawater through an electromagnetic filtration process below the pool deck, quietly providing the salt bath with its healing water and the city with clean drinking water. What results are two products: pure drinkable water that is directed into the city's primary water piping grid, and clear water with twelve percent salinity. The drinking water is piped to shore, while the salt water supplies the thermal baths before it is redirected back to the ocean through a smart release system, mitigating most of the usual problems associated with returning brine water to the sea," said the design team. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Proxima B

Astronomers have just discovered an Earth-like planet orbiting the closest star to our own: Proxima Centauri. It's been named "Proxima b," and is located 4.25-light-years from Earth. The planet itself is at least 30% larger than Earth and orbits the star at a distance of 7.3-million kilometers - less than 5% of the distance between Earth and the sun - making its year last 11.2 Earth days. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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Bioluminescent Shrimp

Photo credit: Tdub Photo

Tdub Photo headed to Seto Inland Sea in Japan for his latest photo series, titled "The Weeping Stones". It captures the stunning soothing blue glow of bioluminescent shrimp against the rocks of Seto. "This urge to do more is what drove us to create this year's set. This set was created by pouring the 'sea fireflies' over rocks and points along the shore to give the impression that the stones were 'weeping,'" said Trevor Williams. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Dog Bigfoot

In North American folklore, Bigfoot is usually described as a large, hairy, bipedal humanoid. Over the years, there have been many alleged sightings, but could this dog have captured a glimpse of the real thing? In this short GoPro video, you see a creature walking through the grassy woods that stands up on two legs like a human, but also appearing to be hairy and ape-like. Individuals claiming to have seen Bigfoot described large eyes, a pronounced brow ridge, and a large, low-set forehead; the top of the head has been described as rounded and crested, similar to the sagittal crest of the male gorilla, with a strong, unpleasant smell. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny demotivational posters gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a metal version of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata.

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Earth Saturn's Rings

Could Earth have rings? Certainly, especially if a small moon were to get hit by an asteroid or comet, shattering it, thus impacting Earth itself to create rings. We know that Saturn's rings are made of ice, the Earth's distance from the Sun, small ice particles would quickly be destroyed by sunlight. So, Earthrings would probably be made of rock, and as illustrator Kevin Gill shows, they would look different if you were seeing sunlight reflected off them versus seeing the Sun through them. Continue reading for more fascinating images from around the web.

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Pink Lagoon

The color pink isn't synonymous with lagoons, but this one, located in the fishing village of Las Coloradas on the eastern coast of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, most certainly is. While it may look Photoshopped, the color comes from both red plankton and the high quantity of brine shrimp in the water - chemicals from the aquatic life seep into the water. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Indian Iron Man
Indian Student Creates Wearable Robot

Making Iron Man proud: This Indian student created a wearable red robot suit.

Posted by AJ+ on Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Engineering student Vimal Govind Manikandan from Kerala, India, managed to build a wearable Iron Man-like exoskeleton that weighs in at a hefty 220-pounds. Despite its heft, this super suit enables its wearer to lift up to 330-pounds with ease. What's most surprising is that it cost him only $749 in parts to make. who knows, the next version may included a functional repulsor beam. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny autocorrect texts gallery. Continue reading for a viral "Batman of Shanghai" video.

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Atomic Blast Slow Motion

The rapatronic camera is a high-speed camera capable of recording a still image with an exposure time as brief as 10 nanoseconds. The camera was developed by Harold Edgerton in the 1940s and was first used to photograph the rapidly changing matter in nuclear explosions within milliseconds of ignition, using exposures of several microseconds. To overcome the speed limitation of a conventional camera's mechanical shutter, the rapatronic camera uses two polarizing filters and a Faraday cell (or in some variants a Kerr cell). Continue reading for another video and more information.

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Monster Black Hole

Researchers have proposed a new theory that the center of blackholes may act as a "back door", or gateway, for wormholes. In other words, anything traveling through a black hole would be stretched, but then returned back to its normal size when emerging in a different part of the universe. "Our theory naturally resolves several problems in the interpretation of electrically-charged black holes. In the first instance, we resolve the problem of the singularity, since there is a door at the centre of the black hole, the wormhole, through which space and time can continue," said Gonzalo Olmo, a Rampn y Cajal researcher at the University of Valencia. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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