tech e blog

XStat Gadget

Revmedx, a company based in Oregon, has invented XStat, a small syringe that can seal gunshot wounds in seconds by releasing small rapidly-expanding sponges into the wound that exert pressure and stop blood flow. Available in two sizes (30mm / 12mm in diameter), it stops hemorrhaging and meant for wounds too deep to be compressed externally or with a tourniquet. Once the homeostatic material is inserted into the wound, it then expands from the inside out and stops the bleeding by creating pressure. The sponges found inside these syringes are all coated with homeostatic agent and contain a radiopaque marker for easy detection via X-ray. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Frozen Bubble

Photo credit: Cheryl Johnson

Soap bubbles are nothing new, but when they're made in freezing cold weather, breathtaking crystals of ice form on their surface; "starting at the bottom and expanding upwards until the entire bubble is covered. Each bubble and pattern created is unique making for some terrific photo opportunities," says Twisted Sifter. Artist and photographer Cheryl Johnson has been capturing this phenomena with different-sized bubbles. Continue reading for more.

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Electricity from Plants

Netherlands-based Plant-e has successfully harnessed electricity from living plants, which can be used to power WiFi hotspots, street lights, and even charge phones. The company has installed over 300 LED streetlights for their "Starry Sky" project, on two sites in the Netherlands. This process basically involves growing plants in 2-square-foot plastic containers, and during this time, they produce more sugars than needed. The excess is cast out through their roots into the surrounding soil and break down into protons and electrons. Plant-e's system uses these electrodes in the soil to await the breakdown of this plant waste, thus conducting electricity. Continue reading for more information.

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Phone Bacteria

The image above, taken by students at the University of Surrey, shows the hundreds of bacteria that thrive in the crevices of your mobile phone. They put their phones in agar-filled petri dishes and monitored what happened over a period of three days. Fortunately, most of the bacteria you see is harmless, but they did discover some traces of staphylococcus aureus, which can cause skin infections. According to Dr Simon Park, the university's senior lecturer in molecular biology, mobile phone users should disinfect their devices each week in order to prevent the build up of bacteria. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Parents and Kid

Some kids are spitting images of their parents, like the father (right) and daughter (left) above. Every cell in an individual's body contains two copies of each gene. This is due to the fact that both mother and father contribute a copy at the time of conception. This original genetic material is copied each time a cell divides so that all cells contain the same DNA. Genes store the information needed for the cell to assemble proteins, which eventually yield specific physical traits. Continue reading for more.

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Translucent Glass Octopus

The glass octopus (above), also known as Vitreledonella richardi, is a transparent, gelatinous, and almost colorless octopod found worldwide in tropical and subtropical seas. Eyes are nearly rectangular in shape as seen from the side. The radula is heterodont, also known as heteroglossan, in which the middle or rhachidian tooth is each array has multiple cusps and the lateral teeth are unicuspid. The female broods her eggs, of which there are hundreds, within the mantle cavity. Continue reading for more translucent animals.

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Flipped Iceberg

Photo credit: Alex Cornell via Colossal

Photographer Alex Cornell managed to captured these mind-boggling pictures of a flipped iceberg during an expedition to Antarctica last month. The translucent blue underside, completely free of snow and debris, is majestic to say the least. Science World says that almost 90% of an iceberg is beneath the surface, making flips extremely rare. Blue icebergs develop from older, deep glaciers which have undergone tremendous pressure experienced for hundreds of years. The process releases and eliminates air that was originally caught in the ice by falling snow. Therefore, icebergs that have been formed from older glaciers have little internal air or reflective surfaces. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading to see the top five viral videos of the day.

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Turda Salt Mine

No, this isn't a base on the dark side of the moon, or one situated beneath the lunar surface in a crater, but rather the Turda Salt Mine in Romania. This was dug in medieval times to harvest medicinal salt, but today, it's a theme park of sorts. Currently, the deepest mine is 393-feet below ground and researchers claim that the micro-climate also offers health benefits especially for people with respiratory difficulties with its constant temperature of around 12°C. Continue reading for a video tour, more pictures and additional information.

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Pacu Fish Teeth Human

Those human-like teeth you see above on that fish have not been Photoshopped on, it's just a Pacu, the name used in the aquarium trade to refer to several common species of omnivorous South American freshwater fish that are related to the piranha. Whereas piranha have pointed, razor-sharp teeth in a pronounced underbite, pacu have squarer, straighter teeth, like a human, and a less severe underbite, or a slight overbite. Continue reading for more bizarre crates you won't believe exist.

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Ping Pong Mouse Trap

What better way to bring in the new year than with 2,014 mouse traps and 2,015 ping pong balls? Created by London-based art directors and filmmakers HarrimanSteel, the idea for this stunt was inspired by generations of teachers using mouse traps to demonstrate the basics of nuclear fission. While the mouse traps took nearly 5-hours to setup, the impact was heightened by staging the stunt within a mirrored tunnel, leaving the team little leeway if things went wrong. Continue reading for the video and more information.

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