tech e blog

There are some fascinating things in this world that just can't be explained by science, and this rock-looking creature is included. In addition to looking exactly like a rock, it feeds on microorganisms from the water and has clear blood that secretes a rare mineral called vanadium. Continue reading for more fascinating discoveries that can't be explained by science.

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That's right, you're not looking at a fossilized egg, but rather an opal, or in technical terms, a hydrated form of silica (water content varies from 3% - 21%). The internal structure of precious opal makes it diffract light; depending on the conditions in which it formed, it can take on many colors. Precious opal ranges from clear through white, gray, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, magenta, rose, pink, slate, olive, brown, and black. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a mind-blowing pyro board.

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In the future, stores and possibly even ATM machines will go the way of vein scanning rather than stick with traditional credit cards. Currently, there are more than 1,000 Swedish shoppers who've signed up to make payments with a simple swipe of their hand, using new technology that 'reads' the patterns of their veins. The company hopes that hand scanning will become an alternative payment method if it is a success during trials in the city of Lund in southern Sweden. To sign up, users have to visit terminal-equipped establishment, where they scan their palm three times and enter their social security and telephone numbers. Next, a text message is then sent to their mobile phone with an activation link to a website, with payments taken directly from customer's bank accounts twice a month. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Ann Makosinski was just another teenager with another science project when she joined her local science fair in Victoria, Canada, last year. Her invention, a flashlight that is powered solely from hand heat, also took home an award at the 2013 Google Science Fair. Ann's parents are both HAM radio operators and like to fiddle with electronics and were satisfied with that result. It's essentially a flashlight that shines for as long as you hold onto it. No more scrambling for and chucking away AA batteries. It could have an immediate impact on more than 1.2 billion people -- one-fifth of the world's population - who, according to the World Bank, lack regular access to electricity. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Further developing existing technology, NHK promises to bring true holographic television images that do not require glasses to nearly all homes in Japan by 2022. Jun Murai, a scientist from Japan's Keio University, says: "Football matches held in Tokyo could be relayed to any stadium in the world where full-sized players would appear so life-like that fans would believe they were at the match." Continue reading for more.

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Pierre Calleja, a French biochemist, has invented an eco-friendly lamp that not only lights up streets and parking garages while cutting CO2 emissions, but runs completely free of electricity, powered solely glowing green algae. It basically uses the energy created by the algae's own photosynthesis process to power the light within, while the algae itself lives on CO2 in the air outside. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Google has just filed a new patent application with the USPTO for embedding micro cameras directly into contact lenses. According to TechCrunch, the various uses include "photographing what a wearer sees, or providing the basic input for a contact-based assistive device for the visually impaired." Continue reading for a video of similar bionic eye technology and more information.

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Nanotechnology is basically the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. Continue reading for five mind-boggling things you may not have known about nanotech.

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Organ transplants may soon be a thing of the past, thanks to this new method of regeneration. Humans have an organ called the thymus, which is critical for maintaining a healthy immune system and it also matures T-cells that help stave off infections. As people get older, the thymus begins to wear down, releasing fewer T-cells. In this experiment, researchers used middle-aged to elderly mice and stimulated production of a protein called FOXN1, which acts as a trigger for genes and is important in the thymus' development. The mices' thymuses responded positively, and organs grew to at least 2.6 times of their previous size and the T-cell counts doubled. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Scientists at Iowa State University have developed new materials that are composed of special polymers designed to completely melt away when a trigger is activated. Practical applications include medical devices that could melt away without harm inside the body, or a covert military device that delivers its data then dissolves without a trace. Continue reading for two videos and more information.

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