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The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest major galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy. Together, these two galaxies dominate the Local Group of galaxies. The diffuse light from Andromeda is caused by the hundreds of billions of stars that compose it. The several distinct stars that surround Andromeda's image are actually stars in our Galaxy that are well in front of the background object. Andromeda is frequently referred to as M31 since it is the 31st object on Messier's list of diffuse sky objects. Continue reading for more.

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How far can the human eye really see? Well, it depends on how many particles of light, or photons, a distant object emits. In other words, the farthest object currently visible with the naked eye is the Andromeda galaxy, which is located 2.6-million light-years from Earth. That's right, the galaxy's 1-trillion stars emit enough light collectively for a few thousand photons to hit each square centimeter of Earth every second. Continue reading for more.

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No, you're not looking at someone in the process of transforming into The Hulk, but rather an interesting science experiment. In this video, a scientist from the University of Toronto, Canada - known as NurdRage on YouTube - places his hand in a jar of hot ice (molten sodium acetate) so it crystallizes around his fingers. Seconds later, the man's fingers are coated in a thick layer of ice. But instead of being cold, the scientist explains that his hand is actually quite warm, 'like a hot bath'. Continue reading for a video on how to make hot ice at home.

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The common name given to the atmospheric gases used in breathing and photosynthesis is air. By volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93% argon, 0.039% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. London-based artist Lauren Bowker and her material exploration studio THE UNSEEN have created a special type of ink that is reactive to the different fluctuations in the wind as well as our own body. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Ever wonder what food, particularly a McDonalds cheeseburger, looks like when dipped in pure hydrochloric acid? The University of Nottingham's Periodic Table of Videos has just the clip for you. According to one of the researchers, "As you're watching me, churning away in your stomach is acid which is one of the first stages in which food is broken down into usable components to give you energy or to make you fat." Continue reading for another McDonalds test that you've probably seen at least once before on Netflix or even the big screen.

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At 02:39 UTC on Monday July 21, 1969, Armstrong opened the hatch, and at 02:51 UTC began his descent to the lunar surface. After describing the surface dust as "very fine-grained" and "almost like a powder," Armstrong stepped off Eagle's footpad and uttered his famous line, "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind" six and a half hours after landing. Aldrin joined him, describing the view as "Magnificent desolation." Continue reading for more.

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We have seen the future of eyewear, and these smart glasses are definitely on the horizon. This innovative device enables those suffering from sight loss to see obstacles and faces, similar to the fictional high-tech visor worn by Geordi La Forge in TV's Star Trek. It consists of a "video camera mounted on the frame of the glasses; a computer processing unit that is small enough to fit in a pocket; and software that provides images of objects close-by to the see-through displays in the eyepieces of the glasses," says The Daily Mail. Continue reading for a BBC news segment and more information.

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Douglas Engelbart at the Stanford Research Institute invented the first mouse prototype in the 1960s with the assistance of his lead engineer Bill English. They christened the device the mouse as early models had a cord attached to the rear part of the device looking like a tail and generally resembling the common mouse. Engelbart never received any royalties for it, as his employer SRI held the patent, which ran out before it became widely used in personal computers. The invention of the mouse was just a small part of Engelbart's much larger project, aimed at augmenting human intellect via the Augmentation Research Center. Continue reading for more.

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While sudden death is common because of the huge voltage of a lightning strike, survivors often fare better than victims of other electrical injuries caused by a more prolonged application of lesser voltage. Experiments on sheep show that a lightning strike to the head of a victim enters through the eyes, ears, nose and mouth, converging at the brainstem, which controls breathing. However, there are some that end up with special abilities after being struck by lightning. Continue reading to see more.

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You've probably seen color-changing mugs before, but now physicist Manuel Linares from Spain has created an ice cream version. Called Xameleon, this ice cream changes colors as it melts and contains such ingredients as strawberries, cocoa, almonds, banana, pistachio, vanilla and caramel. When a reporter asked what's the secret ingredient, this is what Linares said: "I am not giving out too much detail because the patents are still going through." Continue reading to see what Xameleon looks like when frozen.

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