tech e blog

iPhone Running Android

Programmer Nick Lee, known for putting Windows 95 on an Apple Watch, unveils his latest project: a 3D-printed iPhone case that lets you run a fully-operational version of Android on an iPhone. First, he cloned the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) to make a custom Android Marshmallow build to run on a board he purchased. He then 3D printed an iPhone-sized enclosure, and proceeded to install the board, battery, resistor, along with a boost converter to make the lightweight case you see above. That's not all, HDMI, USB ports, and an SD card slot was added to finish things off. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of a crazy drone racing battle.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo


Microsoft Pre-Touch

Microsoft's new Pre-Touch Sensing technology works exactly as you'd expect, as it uses a mobile phone's ability to sense how you are gripping the device, as well as when and where the fingers are approaching it, to adapt interfaces on the fly. In the tech demo, you'll see it used in both media and game applications. There's no word yet on when it will be implemented into future smartphones, but Minecraft would be a great start. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny demotivational posters gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of the Star Wars Rogue One trailer in LEGO.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo


Google Tilt Brush

Google's Tilt Brush enables one to paint in three-dimensional space with virtual reality. Simply choose your colors, brushes and start painting with a wave of your hand, using any room as a blank slate. You'll be able to step around, in and through your drawings as you go. Thanks to VR, otherwise-impossible materials like fire, stars or snowflakes, can be used as the painting medium. Continue reading for two more videos and information.

Continue Reading


Ink Hunter Tattoo App

Always wanted to get a tattoo, but afraid that the artist might mess it up? If so, then Ink Hunter is just the app you need. This piece of mobile software digitally projects tattoos on your body using augmented reality and your smartphone's camera. Simply upload a design, select what portion you want it projected on, and then apply it in real time with full customization options - color, size, angle, etc. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny school pictures gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of someone putting their iPhone 6S into an expanding foam ball.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo


Robot Lawyer

Joshua Browder, a 19-year-old British programmer currently studying at MIT, has created "DoNotPay", the world's first robot lawyer. Registered users can use the service to ask any kind of legal question and receive relevant auto-generated answers. This project began as a free website to help people appeal parking tickets, which soon became an automatic appeal generator, using previously successful letters as a template. "As a 19-year-old, I have coded the entirety of the robot on my own, and I think it does a reasonable job of replacing parking lawyers. I know there are thousands of programmers with decades more experience than me working on similar issues. If it is one day possible for any citizen to get the same standard of legal representation as a billionaire, how can that not be a good thing," said Browder. Continue reading for a video demonstration and more information.

Continue Reading


Photo-Realistic Unreal Engine

Swedish digital artist Rense de Boer used photogrammetry to create a photo-realistic 4K virtual world using Unreal Engine 4, the same one Capcom built Street Fighter V with. The photogrammetry technique involves taking a a multitude of real things / places, scanning the photos, combining them and then turning it all into a 3D landscape. The final touches, smoothing, weather effects, etc., are completed in post production by artists. Click here to view the first image in this week's art of trolling gallery. Continue reading for a viral video showing how to turn an iPhone into a functional microscope.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo



Virtual Desktop Oculus

We have seen the future of Windows, and it's in virtual reality. Introducing Virtual Desktop, a free app that transforms the entire Windows operating system into a VR-capable platform. In addition to surfing the web, you can also use it for games (Minecraft, Street Fighter V, etc.), Facebook, or even Photoshop. When launched, users are greeted with a curved, floating Windows desktop - wallpaper, icons, Start button and all. Continue reading for a tech demo and more information.

Continue Reading


FaceDirector

Disney's FaceDirector technology enables you to manipulate actors' emotions in real time. This is made possible because it takes two shots, with actors performing different ways in each shot, and then continuously blending them together into one image. " In contrast to most previous works, our approach operates entirely in image space, avoiding the need of 3D facial reconstruction. We demonstrate that our method can synthesize visually believable performances with applications in emotion transition, performance correction, and timing control," said Disney Research. Continue reading for more cool pictures from around the web.

Continue Reading


Bill Gates Windows 1.0

Windows 1.0 was released on November 20, 1985, as the first version of the Microsoft Windows line. This operating system runs as a graphical, 16-bit multi-tasking shell on top of an existing MS-DOS installation, to provide an environment which can run graphical programs designed for Windows, in addition to existing MS-DOS software. Company founder Bill Gates spearheaded development after seeing a demo of a similar software suite known as Visi On at COMDEX. Continue reading for more interesting historical photos.

Continue Reading


Star Citizen

Procedural generation is basically a method of creating data algorithmically as opposed to manually, commonly used for creating textures. The game "Star Citizen" uses this method to create worlds in real-time, automatically generating large planets, with seamless transitions between space and surfaces. Continue reading for two more videos and information.

Continue Reading