tech e blog

Ganymede Underground Ocean

NASA researchers discovered that the Jupiter-orbiting moon Ganymede - the largest moon in our solar system - has an ocean beneath its icy surface, raising the prospects for life. It's 60 miles (100 km) thick, which is 10 times deeper than Earth's oceans. All this water is buried under a 95-mile (150-km) crust of mostly ice. Continue reading for another pictures and more information.

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Large Asteroid Impact

Sure, a large asteroid may not impact Earth in our lifetimes, but if one does happen to appear out of nowhere, this simulation shows what it may look like. Anselmo la Manna took this devastating computer simulation - from the 2005 Discovery Channel miniseries Miracle Planet - of a massive 310-mile-wide asteroid impacting the Earth and paired it with Pink Floyd's "The Great Gig in the Sky." Continue reading to watch.

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Bondi Beach

When viewed from space, Bondi Beach in Sydney, Australia looks like a painting - for those interested in checking it out just copy and paste these coordinates into Google Earth 33°53'28"S 151°16'40"E. Benjamin Grant says: "Overview of Bondi Beach in Sydney. One of the city's most popular destinations, the beach gets its name from the Aboriginal word 'Bondi' that means waves breaking over rocks." Continue reading for more.

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Blue Sunset Mars

Most sunsets are boring, this one on Mars is not, or at least until humans start living on the Red Planet, and only then would it become a common sight. According to NASA, "The sun descends to the Martian horizon and sets in this 30-second movie simulation using images from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity." Let's just hope they release a sunrise video next. Continue reading for the clip.

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Midnight Planetarium Watch

Priced at $245K, Midnight Planetarium is one of the coolest time pieces you'll ever see. Created by Van Cleef & Arpels in partnership with Christiaan van der Klaauw, it features the 6 closest planets in our solar system accurately rotating around the Sun. This watch contains 396 individual parts and boasts planets that are represented by precious and semi-precious stones, ranging from red jasper to serpentine and turquoise. That's not all, a "lucky day" function uses the bezel to let owners to select any day of the year as the special day, and the Earth will fall underneath the painted star on the watch's crystal on that day every year. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos of today, including what bartenders really think about your Tinder dates.

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Comet 67P Up-Close

Here are new up-close images of Comet 67P, as captured by the Rosetta Probe. The flyby took place at approximately 12:41 GMT on February 14, transmitting a series of images showing the comet's layered and fractured surface. You can see a complicated, broken landscape mixed with smooth, dust-covered areas, boulders measuring up to tens of meters, and outlines of near-circular objects. This close pass also allowed the spacecraft's instruments to take samples of the inner regions of 67P's coma. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Martian Plumes

Photo credit: Gizmag / Mysterious Universe

Researchers at the European Space Agency noticed a plume of dust on two separate dates while reviewing Hubble images, but coming from the same general location. Dust plumes aren't entirely unheard of on Mars, but none were ever this big, at more than 250-kilometers (155-miles) high. The strange thing is that no one really know why these dust plumes are happening, as previous plumes have never exceeded 100-kilometers (62-miles) high. For the record, Mars has experienced planet-wide dust storms that can last for up to a year, and the reason for the longevity of these storms is that the dust is so light it stays airborne for a very long time once picked up. However, a dust storm and a localized dust plume are two very different things. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading to see the five most popular viral videos of today.

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Alien Orbs

Astrobiologist Dr Milton Wainwright used balloons to collect samples of dust and particles 16 miles up in the Earth's atmosphere, and in one sample, he found a tiny metal ball that left impact crater in the device. He claims the metal orb, the same width as a human hair and made from titanium, may have been traveling fast as came from outer space. Wainwright says it was found to be oozing a strange material, which is biological and could in fact be a colony of tiny microorganisms. Continue reading for more information.

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Mars One 100

Mars One, the Dutch-based venture, announced yesterday that it's slimmed down its list of applicants to just 50 men and 50 women who will compete for the chance to take a one-way trip to the red planet. For those who haven't been following the Mars One project, they plan to put on a reality-TV competition to select 24 prospective crew members for missions to Mars, starting as early as 2024. Winners would be expected to start up a permanent colony on the Red Planet. Tens of thousands signed up for Mars One consideration in 2013, and the 100 competitors were chosen after going through interviews with chief medical officer Norbert Kraft who says: "Being one of the best individual candidates does not automatically make you the greatest team player, so I look forward to seeing how the candidates progress and work together in the upcoming challenges." Continue reading for a video and more information.

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NASA Titan Submarine

What would a submarine to explore the liquid methane seas of Saturn's Moon Titan look like? NASA has unveiled an innovative 2200-pound submarine design that would explore both the shoreline and the depths of this strange world that has methane rain, rivers and seas. It would be powered by a 1 kW radiothermal Stirling generator, which would not only provide power to propel the craft, but also keep the electronics from freezing. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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