tech e blog

Called the Osteoid, this futuristic-looking creation appears to be straight from a science fiction film, but Deniz Karahasin's invention is actually a 3D-printed cast that speeds up bone healing by nearly 40% using ultrasound technology. Simply put, Osteoid requires a mere 20-minutes, thanks to low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) leads that are placed on the skin, right over the bone injury. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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3D printing a house has now become a reality, thanks to Winsun, a Chinese company based in Suzhou, China. Winsun's 3D-printed houses make use of old construction waste and cement, laid down one layer at a time. These homes cost just $4,800 to build and can be printed in bulk, approximately 10 in 24-hours. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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If you're a technology enthusiast, none of these may come as a surprise, but for others, you may be surprised that Apple pulled some of their most recent ideas from other places, gadgets. Take for example, Siri, the voice service itself is powered by Nuance and its original interface borrowed ideas from Xiaoi Bot, an Android app released in 2010. However, there's nothing wrong with improving upon existing ideas, like how Facebook improved upon the now almost defunct MySpace. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny internet trolls gallery. Continue reading for a viral video showing what an ultra busy intersection is like with no traffic lights.

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While it may look like a futuristic vehicle from the next TRON movie, it's just the Toyota FV2 (Fun Vehicle 2). The company claims the bike, while autonomous (self-driving), will be 'driving fun in the future' by reading your emotions and providing information on its augmented reality display. It features four wheels - one at the rear, two in the middle and one at the front - and at the top of the bike is a sliding panel that closes when the bike is not in use. After unlocking, the bike will slide the panel up, allowing you to sit in the middle and also provide an interactive display on the panel's interior. With this display, you can then give the bike a destination you wish to travel to. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Researchers at MIT, lead by Yichen, have developed a mind-bending vanishing mirror that turns into a window, solveing the problem of photographing things at odd angles, using a structure made of 84 ultrathin layers that alternate between ordinary glass and tantalum oxide. That's right, "as light passes from one of these layers to the next, some gets partially reflected - except for light that approaches from a certain angle. Any light that hits the surface of a layer at this so-called Brewster angle, and with a particular polarisation, will pass straight through as if the surface wasn't there. The Brewster angle is different for each pair of materials as it depends on their refractive indices," according to New Scientist. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Don't you just coming up to a traffic light only for it to have just turned yellow? You can take out the guesswork with the hourglass LED design you see above. Simply put, all drivers will know exactly how much time they have until the next light, complete with countdown meter. We've rounded up three of the coolest traffic light designs of the future for your viewing enjoyment. Continue reading to see them all.

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At first glance, this may look like a prop for an upcoming Star Wars movie, but it's actually the MorpHex II, which was created by Norwegian Engineer Kare Halvorsen. This updated version not only has the ability to transform from a ball to a robot, but it's also to roll about while in sphere form. To accomplish this, the six-legged robot uses the motors on one side of its body to push itself along while contracted into a ball. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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In the future, stores and possibly even ATM machines will go the way of vein scanning rather than stick with traditional credit cards. Currently, there are more than 1,000 Swedish shoppers who've signed up to make payments with a simple swipe of their hand, using new technology that 'reads' the patterns of their veins. The company hopes that hand scanning will become an alternative payment method if it is a success during trials in the city of Lund in southern Sweden. To sign up, users have to visit terminal-equipped establishment, where they scan their palm three times and enter their social security and telephone numbers. Next, a text message is then sent to their mobile phone with an activation link to a website, with payments taken directly from customer's bank accounts twice a month. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Germany-based laser weapons specialist Patrick Priebe has just unveiled his latest project, a Spider-Man-inspired electromagnetic web shooter that fires a harpoon-tipped length fishing line into styrofoam targets. Similar to the movie / comic counterparts, this one is worn on the wrist, and fired by pressing on a button located on a custom-built plate under the glove material, on the user's palm. Additional features include an aiming laser and LEDs to indicate its operational status. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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There are Bugatti supercars, and then the appliance company. The latter has just unveiled Noun, a fully-transparent glass toaster that will set you back a cool $1000. Rather than the standard glowing heating elements, it utilizes two panels of "a special transparent glass ceramic material with an ultra-high resistance semiconductor." Its panels make use of far infrared radiation to generate temperatures as high as 300°C (572°F) within 80-seconds, enabling you to not only make toast, but also cook foods like steak and vegetables. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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