tech e blog

XStat Gadget

Revmedx, a company based in Oregon, has invented XStat, a small syringe that can seal gunshot wounds in seconds by releasing small rapidly-expanding sponges into the wound that exert pressure and stop blood flow. Available in two sizes (30mm / 12mm in diameter), it stops hemorrhaging and meant for wounds too deep to be compressed externally or with a tourniquet. Once the homeostatic material is inserted into the wound, it then expands from the inside out and stops the bleeding by creating pressure. The sponges found inside these syringes are all coated with homeostatic agent and contain a radiopaque marker for easy detection via X-ray. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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Borderline Genius Inventions

People who prefer soda from cans probably would love to have a version that can be resealed, or at least closed up for safe transport. The simple design you see above just adds another layer in-between the liquid and top. On a similar food-related note, making breakfast would be so much more enjoyable for geeks if there was a lightsaber-inspired knife that actually toasted bread as you sliced it. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading to see the top five viral videos for today.

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Electricity from Plants

Netherlands-based Plant-e has successfully harnessed electricity from living plants, which can be used to power WiFi hotspots, street lights, and even charge phones. The company has installed over 300 LED streetlights for their "Starry Sky" project, on two sites in the Netherlands. This process basically involves growing plants in 2-square-foot plastic containers, and during this time, they produce more sugars than needed. The excess is cast out through their roots into the surrounding soil and break down into protons and electrons. Plant-e's system uses these electrodes in the soil to await the breakdown of this plant waste, thus conducting electricity. Continue reading for more information.

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Pocket watch Vending Machine

The rise of railroading during the last half of the 19th century led to the widespread use of pocket watches, and even a vending machine in Berlin, Germany during the 1960s designed specifically for these timepieces. Did you know that the first vending machine in the US was built in 1888 by the Thomas Adams Gum Company? It sold gum on New York City train platforms. The idea of adding games to these machines as a further incentive to buy came in 1897 when the Pulver Manufacturing Company added small figures, which would move around whenever somebody bought some gum from their machines. The birth of slot machines and pinball is ultimately rooted in these early devices. Continue reading for more.

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KeySweeper

From afar, this looks like any old phone charger, but open up the computer it's wirelessly connected to, and you'll see that it's recording everything you type. Called KeySweeper, this gadget sniffs out every key you type on specific Microsoft-branded 2.4-GHz wireless keyboards released before July 2011. When it's unplugged from the wall, the device looks like it powers down, when in reality, it just switches to battery power while continuing to log and transmit data. Continue reading for a video and more information.

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F-35 Weapons

Lockheed Martin has just released a new picture showing the sleek F-35 Lightning II with all of the weapons it can use after being tested by the Systems Development and Demonstration Weapons Suite. According to Jalopnik, "This represents a baseline capability that will be expanded with other weapons once the jet is fully operational towards the end of the decade." Click here to view the first image in this week's demotivational poster gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a supermarket mascot gone wild.

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$1 Million Robot

For a cool $1-million, Kuratas, the Gundam-inspired rideable robot by Suidobashi Heavy Industry, can now be yours. This machine is equipped with a gatling gun capable of shooting 6,000 BB bullets a minute, which starts firing when the pilot smiles. It can be controlled either through the one-man cockpit or with a data-enabled smartphone. Unfortunately, as of right now, it only ships to the Kanto region of Japan, and is advertised as a kit, which means you should have a Japanese-reading engineer on-hand to help you piece things together. If you're extremely wealthy and want one at all costs, these two caveats will be trivial. Continue reading for more images of the actual robot and a link to its product page.

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JSF Helmet

Did you know that the F-35 does not need to be physically pointing at its target for weapons to be successful? It uses sensors to track and target a nearby aircraft from any orientation and then provide the information to the pilot through their helmet for complete vision - also sends data to the seeker-head of a missile for accurate targeting. The helmet system replaces the display-suite-mounted head-up display used in earlier fighters. The F-35's systems provide the edge in the "observe, orient, decide, and act" OODA loop; stealth and advanced sensors aid in observation, automated target tracking helps in orientation, sensor fusion simplifies decision making, and the aircraft's controls allow the pilot to keep their focus on the targets, rather than the controls of their aircraft. Continue reading for more.

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Project Ara

Project Ara by Google is basically an open platform for creating highly modular smartphones that will include a structural frame (endoskeleton that holds smartphone modules of the owner's choice), such as a display, camera or an extra battery. It would allow users to swap out malfunctioning modules or upgrade individual modules as innovations emerge, providing longer lifetime cycles for the handset, and potentially reducing electronic waste. It's hitting Puerto Rico later this year, but there's no word yet on pricing of the individual components nor a complete handset. Continue reading for more hands-on pictures, a video and additional information.

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BMW Intelligent Lighting Lasers

Unlike other modern automotive lighting systems, the BMW M4 Concept Iconic Lights employs "High Power Laser" diodes for projecting driver information directly onto the road in front of the vehicle, allowing them to concentrate on traffic even in pitch black darkness. Selective Beam technology helps the headlights adapt themselves to oncoming traffic, to make sure the drivers are not blinded by the light, thanks to laser technology. Plus, the Dynamic Light Spot function warns drivers of incoming pedestrians or animals from a distance of 100 meters. Click here to view the first image in this week's geek life gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of Japanese carpenters fitting together perfectly cut pieces of wood.

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