tech e blog

Cave of the Crystals

Cave of the Crystals in Mexico is extremely hot with air temperatures reaching up to 58 °C (136 °F) with 90 to 99 percent humidity. The cave is relatively unexplored due to these factors. Without proper protection people can only endure approximately ten minutes of exposure at a time. A group of scientists known as the Naica Project have been heavily involved in researching these caverns. Continue reading for more mind-blowing natural caves you can actually visit.

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Heart Island

Wasting time browsing random places on Google Earth isn't too unusual, but while randomly zooming in on different parts of the world, this person came across something that really stood out. If you guessed a heart-shaped island, you'd be correct. It's located off the coast of Croatia, and if you scroll past the coast of the Adriatic Sea, you can become a virtual tourist yourself. Continue reading to browse the interactive map and for more pictures.

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Antelope Canyon

Photo credit: Remizik / Reddit

Remizik of Reddit is a professional photographer who's always wanted to capture the beauty of Lower Antelope Canyon near Page, Arizona, but missed out on a chance previously. However, he went back in 2013 and managed to capture these breathtaking shots. Prior to the installation of metal stairways, visiting the canyon required climbing along pre-installed ladders in certain areas. Even following the installation of stairways, it is a more difficult hike than Upper Antelope - it is longer, narrower in spots, and even footing is not available in all areas. At the end, the climb out requires several flights of stairs. Continue reading for more images and information.

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Underwater River

At first glance, the image above appears to show a diver in a lake of some sort, but in reality, it's an underground river called Cenote Angelita in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. They are common geological forms in low latitude regions, particularly on islands, coastlines, and platforms with young post-Paleozoic limestones that have little soil development. The Yucatan Peninsula contains a vast coastal aquifer system, which is typically density-stratified. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Solvay Hut

This is not an optical illusion, but rather a real hut. Called "The Solvay Hut", this mountain hut is located on the north-eastern ridge of the Matterhorn, near Zermatt in the canton of Valais. At 4,003 metres (13,133 ft) it is the highest mountain hut owned by the Swiss Alpine Club, but can be used only in case of emergency. The Hornli Hut lying on the same ridge is the starting point of the normal route to the summit. It was built in 1915, 50 years after the first ascent of the Matterhorn which took place on the same ridge. It offers 10 beds and is equipped with a radiotelephone. The hut was named after its founder Ernest Solvay, a Belgian chemist and industrialist. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Low and High Tide

Photo credit: Michael Marten via VN

In many places, it can be a bit challenging to determine when low and high tide arrive, but the tidal changes in these pictures, captured by photographer Michael Marten, show the drastic differences in some areas. All of these images are documented in his "Sea Change" collection. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for an interesting viral time-lapse video of a baby learning how to walk.

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Hot Air Balloon Festival

Just when you thought you've seen it all, this Darth Vader hot air balloon shows up. According to Hi Consumption, "Originally the concept was just a joke, but after a few loose ends were tied with Steve Sansweet from Lucasfilm, these die hard Star Wars fans dream became a reality with this incredible Darth Vader Hot Air Balloon." Continue reading for more.

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Skeleton Coast

The Skeleton Coast spans from Namibia to Angola, and sounds like a place you'd find Captain Jack Sparrow hanging out at. The Bushmen of the Namibian Interior call the desolate place "The Land God Made in Anger," complete with animals remains and rusted boats. The name Skeleton Coast was invented by John Henry Marsh as the title for the book he wrote chronicling the shipwreck of the Dunedin Star. Since the book was first published in 1944 it has become so well known that the coast is now generally referred to as Skeleton Coast and is given that as its official name on most maps today. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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St. Mary Axe

St. Mary Axe (above) is a medieval church in the City of London that still stands today, blending seamlessly with the modern buildings surrounding it. The church gave its name to a street of the same name, which links Leadenhall Street with Camomile Street and Houndsditch. No. 30 was the location of the Baltic Exchange until it was destroyed by an IRA bomb in 1992; the Exchange is now located at No. 38 just to the north of its former address. On the site of the old Baltic Exchange now stands 30 St. Mary Axe, a skyscraper known colloquially as The Gherkin because of its distinctive shape. Continue reading for more.

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Hammock Festival

Festivals, such as Coachella, can be exciting to attend, but it's definitely nothing like the International Highline Meeting in Monte Piana. Highline Meeting brings together the world's most extreme slackliners. Approximately 18 highlines are set up, ranging from 18 feet high to more than 300 feet off the ground. For those not afraid of heights, a mere $40 gets you a place at one of the most dangerous napping places in the world. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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