tech e blog

Game Boy Eclipse

Photo credit: ZHX via Peta Pixel

The Game Boy Camera was first released on September 17, 1998 in Japan, and is compatible with all of the Game Boy platforms (with the exception of Game Boy Micro). The camera itself sports a 128x128 pixel CMOS sensor, and can store 128x112, black & white digital images using the 4-color palette of the Game Boy system. Reddit user "ZHX" decided to use one to shoot the solar eclipse from Portland, Oregon this week, and the image above was the result. Continue reading for another video, a picture of the actual rig, and more information.

Continue Reading


Underpass Studio

With home prices continue to soar, architects like Fernando Abellanas, are looking for unconventional living spaces that may not look pretty, but definitely work. Called the "Underpass Studio," this living space located beneath a busy highway in Valencia, Spain, consists of a wooden platform that hangs by a steel frame that grips the bridge's concrete lip. A hand crank allows you to move the platform from side to side, directly under the bridge to the column where the living space is. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

Continue Reading


Pixelated Wood Sculptures

Photo credit: Bored Panda

This is not an optical illusion, just a real pixelated sculpture made entirely from wood by artist Hsu Tung Han. The block-shaped details were all hand-carved separately from the other parts of the sculpture to create the eye-popping effect. His latest project depicts a snorkeler underwater, with the wooden pixels representing the water that surrounds the man. Continue reading for more pictures.

Continue Reading


Mini Chevy Nova

Your eyes aren't playing tricks, this is a real miniature 1970 Chevy Nova. It rides on a handmade tube chassis and fiberglass body, with a Ford Mustang-sourced front suspension, Toyota 8-bolt differential and coolest of all, a fuel-injected Kawasaki ZX motorcycle motor pushing nearly 200-horses sent trough a 6-speed transmission. Continue reading for another video, more pictures and information.

Continue Reading


Miniatur Wunderland

Miniatur Wunderland in Hamburg, Germany is currently the world's largest model railway, and to give those who aren't able to visit a closer view, Google last year built a miniature version of its Street View car to capture the streets within. By 2020, the exhibition is expected to have reached its final construction phase, including at least a total of ten new sections in a model area of over 24,757 sq ft. It includes 1,300 trains made up of over 10,000 carriages, over 100,000 moving vehicles, ca. 500,000 lights, 130,000 trees, and 400,000 human figurines. Continue reading for another video tour and more information.

Continue Reading


Supreme Brick Louis Vuitton

Supreme is best known for their limited edition clothing pieces, but last year, the company released a brick embossed with its logo, and it sold out very quickly to say the least. Now one fan, Doug Schwartz, has taken this piece and encased it in a Louis Vuitton monogrammed cube to confront "our collective hypnosis and seduction with material objects in relationship to how fashion continually reinvents itself at an exponential pace." Continue reading for more pictures and information.

Continue Reading


Hobbit House Real

At first glance, this may look like a scene from The Lord of the Rings or The Hobbit, but it's a real home, built by Nigel Kirkwood. Believe it or not, this living space was not inspired by movies, but rather his fascination with the natural sustainability of tunnels after working in the mining industry for 25-years. It's located in Quindalup, Western Australia, and the home is buried under almost 1,000 tons of soil. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

Continue Reading


Floating Hotel Sweden

No, this isn't a scene from Game of Thrones, but rather a real floating hotel. Called the "Arctic Bath Floating Hotel," it's located in the middle of a Swedish river, and will be open year-round. Featuring unparalleled views of the northern lights, cold baths, saunas, spa treatments, a shopping center, community lounge, and a stunning restaurant. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

Continue Reading


Disney's River Country



Photo credit: Seph Lawless

Disney's River Country was basically the first water park at Walt Disney World, located near Disney's Fort Wilderness Resort & Campground. It opened on June 20, 1976, and closed indefinitely on November 2, 2001. The park featured a sandy bottom and unique water filtering system using confluent water from adjacent Bay Lake, which was dammed off creating a natural-looking man-made lagoon. The park's water was at the higher level than the lake's, which was an effort to prevent lake water from going into the park. Last year, Disney announced that they would drain and fill in Upstream Plunge, the 330,000 gallon pool. There are no immediate plans to tear down any other part of the park. Along with Discovery Island, it was left to deteriorate rather than be demolished. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of ten weird "As Seen On TV" gadgets.

Continue Reading

Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo Photo


1929 Camera

Photo credit: Martijn van Oers via Bored Panda

Photographer Martjn van Oers recently purchased an original Zeiss Ikon 520/2 - a folding medium-format camera - from a second-hand store, and inside, he discovered roll of undeveloped film with the word 'EXPOSE' on it. So, he took it to his friend Johan Holleman, who has been developing his own films for the most part of his life, to help recover some of them. "We scanned the negatives and found four images had enough detail in them to tell that the last time this camera was used, it belonged to a man (who's even in one of the pictures, carrying the camera's case) who probably brought his expensive piece of gear on one of his travels," said Oers. Continue reading to see what he found.

Continue Reading