tech e blog

Camera Lens Rocket Launch

Photo credit: John Kraus via Peta Pixel

Photographer John Kraus was at Cape Canaveral yesterday to cover the Atlas V rocket launch with two Nikon D7000 cameras at Space Launch Complex 41. Both were setup to be sound-activated and set to shoot the launch at different angles, while having the lenses wrapped in plastic grocery bags with a hole cut out for the front element to poke through. One of them was safely located 500-feet away from the blast, while the other was just 300-feet, and as you can see, that one didn't quite fare so well. Continue reading to see the aftermath and for the full launch video.

Camera Lens Rocket Launch
Camera Lens Rocket Launch
Camera Lens Rocket Launch
Camera Lens Rocket Launch
Camera Lens Rocket Launch

"This image is why I think there was a mixture of both water and solid exhaust on my lens. The Aerojet Rocketdyne AJ-60A solid rocket motors used on this rocket are fueled by hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene, which is very acidic. The residue is a sort of dried, cake-y, powdered material stuck to the lens. After I got home, I took a wet cloth and wiped off the powdery substance. It came off relatively easily, and I initially thought the lens was fine after I dried it off. That's not sand or dirt resting on the glass - that's pitting in the front element itself," said John.










This entry was posted on 03/03 00:00am and is filed under Photography, Space, Unusual .
You can leave a response.

Interesting Posts Around the Web