The Sony MSX “was a Microsoft-led attempt to create unified standards among hardware makers, conceived by one-time Microsoft Japan executive Kazuhiko Nishi.” Commercial after the jump.

Nishi’s standard consisted primarily of several off-the-shelf parts; the main CPU was a 3.58 MHz Zilog Z80, the graphics chip a Texas Instruments TMS9918 with 16 KB of dedicated VRAM, and the sound was provided by the AY-3-8910 chip manufactured by General Instrument (GI). These components alongside Microsoft’s MSX BASIC made the MSX a competitive, though somewhat more expensive home computer package

The Sony MSX “was a Microsoft-led attempt to create unified standards among hardware makers, conceived by one-time Microsoft Japan executive Kazuhiko Nishi.” Commercial after the jump.

Nishi’s standard consisted primarily of several off-the-shelf parts; the main CPU was a 3.58 MHz Zilog Z80, the graphics chip a Texas Instruments TMS9918 with 16 KB of dedicated VRAM, and the sound was provided by the AY-3-8910 chip manufactured by General Instrument (GI). These components alongside Microsoft’s MSX BASIC made the MSX a competitive, though somewhat more expensive home computer package