IBM researchers have developed a next-generation chip cooling method called “high thermal conductivity interface technology.” Basically, “a ‘highly viscous paste’ is applied between the ‘chip cap and the hot chip’ in order to decrease thermal resistance, while the ‘tree-like’ architecture enables the goo to spread more uniformly and attain a thickness of less than 10 micrometers.”

Although the concept seems to rely on carefully structured heatsinks and thinly applied thermal paste, the proposed results of this energy-free cooling contraption are indeed impressive, and if IBM’s snazzy contrivance can honestly perform “ten times better” than current applications

[via engadget]

IBM researchers have developed a next-generation chip cooling method called “high thermal conductivity interface technology.” Basically, “a ‘highly viscous paste’ is applied between the ‘chip cap and the hot chip’ in order to decrease thermal resistance, while the ‘tree-like’ architecture enables the goo to spread more uniformly and attain a thickness of less than 10 micrometers.”

Although the concept seems to rely on carefully structured heatsinks and thinly applied thermal paste, the proposed results of this energy-free cooling contraption are indeed impressive, and if IBM’s snazzy contrivance can honestly perform “ten times better” than current applications

[via engadget]