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Fast Radio Burst Space

Photo credit: Dr. Peter Klages
Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) scientists have officially discovered the second repeating fast radio burst (FRB) – short bursts of radio waves coming from far outside our Milky Way galaxy – ever recorded. “Until now, there was only one known repeating FRB. Knowing that there is another suggests that there could be more out there. And with more repeaters and more sources available for study, we may be able to understand these cosmic puzzles — where they’re from and what causes them,” said Ingrid Stairs, a member of the CHIME team and an astrophysicist at UBC. Read more for another video and additional information.

Toyota Sera Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale

For those who’ve never heard of this vehicle, the Toyota Sera (EXY10) is basically a 3-door 2+2 hatchback coupe manufactured by Toyota from 1990 to 1996. It was released with a single 1.5 L (1496 cc) inline 4 5E-FHE engine configuration and body style, with optional configurations for its transmission, brakes, cold climate and sound-system. A total of 15,941 were built between February 1990 and December 1995, with 15,852 units registered in Japan. A 1990 model is heading to the 2019 Barrett-Jaclson Scottsdale, and according to the auction house, this is one of the first Seras to be built and the first one to be imported to the U.S. under the federal 25-year importation law. Read more for another video and additional information.

Muse Brain-Sensing Headband

The Muse Brain-Sensing Headband is designed to make mediation easy, and it’s being offered for just $159 shipped, today only, originally $199. It provides EEG based real-time neurofeedback to enable you to take the guesswork out of your meditation practice. Put on the headband, plug in your earbuds / headphones, start the app, and close your eyes to immerse yourself within the sounds of a beach or rainforest via a free downloadable Muse App on iOS or Android. Product page. Read more for another hands-on video review and additional information.

Super Blood Wolf Moon Eclipse Supermoon

No, “super blood wolf moon eclipse” is not a fictional name, but rather a real phenomenon. The main event is a total lunar eclipse, also known as an eclipse of the moon, which begins late on Sunday, Jan. 20 and finishes early on Monday, Jan. 21. This type of eclipse happens when the moon passes fully into the shadow of Earth, but this time, it takes on a reddish glow during the event, making it a “blood moon.” Since the moon will make its closest approach to Earth on Jan. 20, it appears larger and more full in the sky, which is known as a “supermoon”. Read more for another video and additional information.



Scientists in Antarctica uncovered a mysterious lake buried under more than 3,500 feet of ice after spending approximately two days drilling into Mercer Subglacial Lake, according to the Subglacial Antarctic Lakes Scientific Access (SALSA). This team of researchers — which includes 45 scientists, drillers and other staff members — sent an instrument down a borehole, capturing rare footage of the body of water which is “twice the size of Manhattan.” Next, they’ll lower a remotely operated vehicle down the hole for more extensive measurements. Read more for two additional videos and information.

Universe Extra Dimensions Dark Energy

A team of Uppsala researchers may have solved the dark energy puzzle that might be constituting 95% of the universe. Their report, published in the journal ‘Physical Review Letters’, claims that the universe in which we live in a nook is actually an expanding bubble in an extra dimension. The Uppsala researchers created a new model with dark energy and our universe riding on an expanding bubble in an extra dimension, and the simulation revealed that our universe is accommodated somewhere on the edge of this bubble. Read more for another video and additional information.

New York Sky Blue

Residents of New York City and its surrounding areas may have noticed an eerie blue glow in the night sky last night, but this wasn’t signaling the arrival or Thanos. Electric utility company Con Edison is trying to figure out what caused its high-voltage equipment failure that cast an otherworldly flash of bright blue light over the city. Authorities reported police and fire department activity near 20th Avenue and 31st Street, the site of a large power plant in Astoria. Con Edison spokesman Bob McGee says it was an “arc flash” caused by malfunction in equipment that carries 138,000 volts of electricity 20 feet up in the air. Read more for another video and additional information.

Quantum GP700 Hypercar

Mechanic Jeff David from Victoria Australia spent 1,800-hours and $300,000 building a homemade hypercar, and it’s officially known as the “Quantum GP700”. It’s claimed to be worth $700,000 now and can accelerate from 0-60mph in a very impressive 2.6 seconds, thanks to a supercharged 2.7-liter four-cylinder engine that generates 700 hp and 482 lb-ft of torque, mated to a six-speed Holinger sequential gearbox. The top speed is limited to 174 mph, but you won’t need to go any faster at the track, especially with its ability to corner up to 2.5 Gs at 112 mph. Read more for another video, additional pictures and information.

Longest Hot Wheels Track

If you’ve never heard of Hot Wheels, it’s basically a brand of 1:64, 1:43, 1:18 and 1:50 scale die-cast toy cars introduced by toy maker Mattel in 1968. The original Hot Wheels were made by Elliot Handler, and conceived to be more like “hot rod” cars, as compared to Matchbox cars which were more like small-scale models of production cars. Mattel Inc. wanted to enter the record books, so they built the longest Hot Wheels track, measuring a massive 560.30 m (1,838 ft 3.05 in) in length – making it longer than the height of New York’s Empire State Building. Read more for various geeky Guinness World Records you probably never knew existed.

Dog-Shaped Cloud
Photo credit: Reddit via Bored Panda
For those who haven’t heard about pareidolia, it’s a psychological phenomenon where the mind responds to an image or a sound by perceiving a familiar pattern where none exists. Those familiar patterns could take the form of animals, faces, or objects in cloud formations, water, or even hidden messages in recordings. In the image above we see what appears to be a dog-shaped cloud in a sitting position. Read more to see additional examples of pareidolia in everyday objects.