In this computer simulation, “we drive through the city at nearly the speed of light, then the faster we go the farther away the houses in front of us seem to be. Also, at increasing velocity the houses close to us appear more and more strongly distorted.” Video after the jump.

The reason for this is the phenomenon of aberration: The direction that an observer ascribes to a light ray (or to any motion) depends on the observer’s state of motion. Using a pinhole camera one can easily understand that aberration must occur if light propagates with a finite velocity

In this computer simulation, “we drive through the city at nearly the speed of light, then the faster we go the farther away the houses in front of us seem to be. Also, at increasing velocity the houses close to us appear more and more strongly distorted.” Video after the jump.

The reason for this is the phenomenon of aberration: The direction that an observer ascribes to a light ray (or to any motion) depends on the observer’s state of motion. Using a pinhole camera one can easily understand that aberration must occur if light propagates with a finite velocity