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Rubiks Cube

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Here’s yet another fascinating look at CubeStormer II, an Android (smartphone) powered LEGO Mindstorms robot that can solve Rubik’s Cubes in just seconds. A special app uses the phone’s camera to capture images of each face of the Rubik’s Cube which it processes to determine the scrambled colours. The solution is found using an advanced two-phase algorithm, originally developed for Speedcuber, enhanced to be multi-threaded to make effective use of the smartphone’s dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 1.2GHz processor. Continue reading for two videos.

Since the weekend is coming up (or already here for some), we thought it’d be a great time to show how you can finally conquer the Rubik’s Cube that’s collecting dust in your home. Best of all, it’ll only take 20 moves or less. Click here to view the first image in today’s viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a fascinating video of an astronaut wringing a wet towel in space.

Let’s face it, not everybody, including geeks, can solve a Rubik’s Cube, Fortunately, for the latter group, many have the skills to build robots that are able to solve any Rubik’s cube in just seconds. Continue reading to see ten of the coolest.

Solving a Rubik’s Cube is hard enough for some people, imagine juggling a few of them simultaneously. That’s exactly what ultra geek David Calvo has accomplished, as he “can juggle three Rubik’s Cubes while solving one.” Video after the jump.

This isn’t Calvo’s first brush with Rubik’s Cube greatness, he already holds the Guinness World Record for the most Rubik’s Cubes solved in one hour (185).

[via Dvice]

A group of college students at the Swinburne University of Technology have built a robot — called Ruby — that is capable of solving a Rubik’s Cube in less than 11-seconds. Basically, it uses cameras to scan each face of the cube, collects the data, and then runs that information through a custom software algorithm. Video after the break.

While Ruby is the fastest documented cube-solving robot, the fastest human time for solving the cube is 6.24 seconds so Ruby still needs some improvements to beat that.

[via Technabob]

Just when you thought you’ve seen all the Rubik’s Cube creations out there, Oskar van Deventer unveils the world’s first 17 x 17 x 17 model, which was created using 3D printing technology. That’s right, Deventer “assembled the cube from 1539 individually dyed pieces, resulting in this oversize 5.5″ cube.” Click here for more pictures. Continue reading to see other Rubik’s Cube-inspired creations by Oskar.

And since the design has actually been turned into a digital format, you can print one for yourself – for the low, low price of $2006.54 (USD).

[via DviceTechnabob]