tech e blog

Boeing Starliner Spacesuit

Set for liftoff in 2018, the CST-100 spacecraft will be headed to the ISS with astronauts wearing a lighter, more versatile Boeing Starliner Spacesuit, which weigh in at just 12-pounds. That's right, they are 40% lighter than its predecessor, and don't require an external cooling system to boot. The gloves will also features touch-screen compatibility, but unfortunately, the suits aren't designed to go outside the cockpit, as it is more of a precautionary measure against sudden cabin depressurization. Continue reading for another video and more information. Click here for a few bonus space facts, illustrations and images.

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Moontopia

The Moontopia project may look like something out of this world, and while it does give us a glimpse at the geometric structures future astronauts could live in, it's actually the Elbphilharmonie Plaza by architectural photographer Hao Chen. The futuristic complex is located on the banks of the River Elbe, and is centered around a 2,100-seat arena positioned at a height of 50 meters, which is detached from the remainder of the structures for sound-proofing reasons. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Andromeda Galaxy Sky

Photo credit: Sandro Casutt

Ever wonder what the Andromeda Galaxy would look like in our night sky, without having to wait 4.5-billion-years for it to collide with the Milky Way? Photographer Sandro Casutt who lives in a remote Swiss village shows us with these amazing images. These are essentially two photos stitched together of Andromedia and the Zervreila Mountain Lagoon region in Switzerland. Click here to view the first image in this week's things that look like other things gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of Cilian Murphy's screen test for Batman Begins.

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Radio Signals Space

Astronomers recently detected six bursts of radio signals that appear to originate from the constellation Auriga, each lasting few milliseconds. Some researchers are claiming these bizarre bursts of energy could be a sign of intelligent extraterrestrial life trying to contact humans. What's really puzzling is that this detection follows 11 previously recorded outbursts from the exact same location, named "FRB 121102," the only known repeater of fast radio bursts (FRBs). Continue reading for a video of the five most mysterious signals detected from space. Click here for a few bonus UFO sightings from around the world.

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Earth Second Moon


After spending nearly a 100-years in Earth's orbit, NASA has recognized a tiny asteroid - known as "asteroid 2016 HO3" - circling our planet as the new "mini moon." This object measures 120-feet to 300-feet in diameter, and slowly circles the sun as well as the Earth. "The asteroid's loops around Earth drift a little ahead or behind from year to year, but when they drift too far forward or backward, Earth's gravity is just strong enough to reverse the drift and hold onto the asteroid so that it never wanders farther away than about 100 times the distance of the moon. The same effect also prevents the asteroid from approaching much closer than about 38 times the distance of the moon. In effect, this small asteroid is caught in a little dance with Earth," said Paul Chodas, manager of NASA's Center for Near-Earth Object (NEO) Studies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of the first Amazon Prime Air drone delivery.

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Black Hole Rips Star Apart

Scientists announced that a rapidly spinning super massive black hole has been discovered tearing apart a sun-like star nearly four billion light years away. The All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASASSN) detected a flash of light 3.8-billion-years ago in a distant galaxy briefly shone with 20 times the brightness of our entire galaxy. Instead of declaring it a supernova, an international team of astronomers now believes it was a star wandering too close to a spinning black hole. "We observed the source for 10 months following the event and have concluded that the explanation is unlikely to lie with an extraordinarily bright supernova. Our results indicate that the event was probably caused by a rapidly spinning supermassive black hole as it destroyed a low-mass star," said lead author of the study, Giorgos Leloudas. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one explaining why you hear a dial tone after someone hangs up in old movies.

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Falling Into a Black Hole

If you were to fall into a small black hole, roughly the size of Earth, tidal forces are magnified off the scale, thus the top of your head would feel much more gravitational pull than the tips of your toes, stretching you longer and longer. British astrophysicis] Sir Martin Rees called this phenomenon "spaghettification," are one would eventually become a stream of subatomic particles that swirl into the black hole. Since your brain would break down into its constituent atoms near instantly, you'd have little chance to see what's going on inside. Continue reading for a full video documentary on black holes and more information.

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Audi Moon Rover

Audi has partnered with PT Scientists, a Google Lunar X Prize team, to develop a vehicle specifically to examine the Apollo 17 moon rover left on the surface. What does the winning team get? How does $20-million sound? The team hopes to launch two rovers by late 2017, sending live HD pictures to Earth as they travel to within 656-feet of the Apollo rover, left on the lunar surface in 1972, and inspect it remotely. The launch is set to take place on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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SolarStratos

SolarStratos, set for an official launch in 2018, is essentially a solar-powered airplane that will take humans to the edge of space and back, achieving an altitude of more than 75,000 feet. This 5-hour mission will subject both the plane and passengers to frigid temperatures and extremely low pressures. At 8.5 meters long, it's powered by a 32-kW electric engine and 20 kWh lithium-ion battery, charged by 22-square-meters of solar cells, which cover the wings. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of the vision of Nintendo at Universal theme parks.

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NASA EmDrive Impossible Engine

NASA's EmDrive prototype leaked in a report by the US space agency. Utilizing a resonant cavity thruster, the EmDrive can move through space without expelling matter to push against, as it's powered by particles of light and microwaves that ricochet inside a sealed cone-shaped chamber. This movement of the particles, along with the waves produced, generate thrust, driving the engine forward. The technology could move an object through space at far greater speeds than laser or solar powered crafts currently under development, all the while confusing physicists since it's seemingly able to propel itself forward without using any fuel. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of a mind-blowing animated "Majora's Mask" fan film.

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