tech e blog

Disposable Camera

Disposable, also known as single-use cameras, were pretty big back in the 80s and 90s, but the kids of today are probably more accustomed to snapping shots with their smartphone to post on social networks. On a similar note, did you know that a company called Photo-Pac produced a cardboard camera beginning in 1949 which shot 8 exposures and which was mailed-in for processing? That's right, cameras were expensive, and would often have been left safely at home when lovely scenes presented themselves. Frustrated with missing photo opportunities, H. M. Stiles had invented a way to enclose 35mm film in an inexpensive enclosure without the expensive precision film transport mechanism. It cost $1.29. Though incredibly similar to the familiar single-use cameras today, Photo-Pac failed to make a permanent impression on the market. Continue reading for more.

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Celebrity Doppelganger

Millard Fillmore is best known as the 13th President of the United States (1850-1853), the last Whig president, and the last president not to be affiliated with either the Democratic or Republican parties. However, Fillmore boasts a striking resemblance to actor, film producer and comedian Alec Baldwin, and the side-by-side image above shows why. Continue reading for more celebrity doppelgangers.

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Commodore Executive 64

The Commodore SX-64, also known as the Executive 64, or VIP-64 in Europe, is a portable, briefcase/suitcase-size "luggable" version of the popular Commodore 64 home computer and holds the distinction of being the first full-color portable computer. The SX-64 features a built-in five-inch composite monitor and a built-in 1541 floppy drive. It weighs 10.5 kg (23lb). The machine is carried by its sturdy handle, which doubles as an adjustable stand. It was announced in January 1983 and released a year later, at US$ 995 (about $2,250 in 2014). Continue reading for more.

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Old Hard Drive

As the 1980s began, HDDs were a rare and very expensive additional feature on PCs; however by the late 1980s, their cost had been reduced to the point where they were standard on all but the cheapest PC. Most HDDs in the early 1980s were sold to PC end users as an external, add-on subsystem. Unfortunately, a mere 10-Megabytes would still set you back $3,695. Continue reading for more random, yet fascinating, photographs.

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Old 5MB Hard Drive

Believe it or not, the image above shows a 5MB IBM hard drive being loaded up onto a Pan Am plane in 1956. It supposedly weighed over a ton, and for comparison, you would need over 1,000 of these units to store the information held in a modern thumb drive. That is just one of the many fascinating historical photos we have rounded up for you today. Continue reading to see them all.

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Hong Kong 1950s

Photo credit: Fan Ho Photography

Award-winning Chinese photographer Fan Ho spent the 1950s in old Hong Kong, and his photographs of the exotic land, can be published in his new book "Fan Ho: A Hong Kong Memoir". Since moving to Hong Kong from Shanghai in 1949, he's documenting these special everyday moments. There were some superstitious people along the way too, as Fan recalls: "With a knife in his hand, a pig butcher said he would chop me. He wanted his spirit back." Continue reading for more.

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Historical Photos

It's time again for some more fascinating historical photos you might not have seen before, including a rare look at Times Square when it was still being built in 1903. As more profitable commerce and industrialization of lower Manhattan pushed homes, theaters, and prostitution northward from the Tenderloin District, Long Acre Square became nicknamed the Thieves Lair for its rollicking reputation as a low entertainment district. By the early 1890s this once sparsely settled stretch of Broadway was ablaze with electric light and thronged by crowds of middle and upper-class theatre, restaurant and cafe patrons. In 1904, New York Times publisher Adolph S. Ochs moved the newspaper's operations to a new skyscraper on 42nd Street at Longacre Square. Ochs persuaded Mayor George B. McClellan, Jr. to construct a subway station there, and the area was renamed "Times Square" on April 8, 1904. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny work pictures gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of an awesome homemade hovercraft a geeky dad made for his kids.

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Apple Bandia Pippin

The Apple Bandai Pippin is a multimedia technology console, designed by Apple Computer. The console was based on the Apple Pippin platform - a derivative of the Apple Macintosh platform. Bandai produced the ATMARK and @WORLD consoles between 1995 and 1997. Bandai manufactured fewer than 100,000 Pippins, but reportedly sold 42,000 systems before discontinuing the line. Production of the system was so limited, there were more keyboard and modem accessories produced than actual systems.

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Largest Manta Ray
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According to Fishing Fury, this gigantic manta ray you see above is the biggest one ever captured. Measuring a staggering 19 feet, 9 inches from wing-tip to wing-tip and weighing over 5000-pounds. That's right, on August 26, 1933, this monster ray became entangled in the anchor rope of Captain A. L. Kahn's fishing boat off the shore of New Jersey. Believe it or not, a 45cm baby manta (held in the hands of Captain Kahn above) was born shortly after its mother fish was dragged ashore. Continue reading for one more picture.

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What you're looking at above is an amazing photo of Little Italy, a neighborhood in lower Manhattan, New York City, in 1900. In 1910 Little Italy had almost 10,000 Italians; that was the peak of the community's Italian population. At the turn of the 20th century over 90% of the residents of the Fourteenth Ward were of Italian birth or origins. In 2010, Little Italy and Chinatown were listed in a single historic district on the National Register of Historic Places. As of 2014, Little Italy is on the verge of extinction. Continue reading for more.

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