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The city of Tikal, later to be one of the most important of the Classic Period Maya cities, was already a significant city by around 350 BC, although it did not match El Mirador. The Late Preclassic cultural florescence collapsed in the 1st century AD and many of the great Maya cities of the epoch were abandoned; the cause of this collapse is as yet unknown. Continue reading for more incredible ancient cities you might not know about.

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While it was one of the most watched moments in television history, with more than half billion viewers, Neil Armstrong's historic first steps on the Moon July 20, 1969 were accidentally taped over. That's right, NASA admits that it erased its only high resolution images of the first moonwalk to make room for electronic data from a satellite. Officials from the agency have concluded that the data that could have produced high resolution images of those already seen was in fact inadvertently erased. Continue reading for more.

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Sure, all of these strange prototypes aren't functional, but they do show what Frog designer Hartmut Esslinger and Steve Jobs had in mind back during the 1980s. Their partnership began when the "Snow White" project began in 1982, which was a design competition won by Frog. According to Twisted Sifter, "The result of this partnership between entrepreneur and designer is of historic dimensions: Steve Jobs was the first to make Strategic Design the core of Apple's Business Strategy. By this, Apple grew from an originally technology focused company into one of the world's most successful, global brands, and this was achieved by creating and delivering innovative and intelligent products." Continue reading to see more.

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Photo credit: NetDNA

The Antarctic Heritage Trust (New Zealand) was founded in 1987 and created to care for sites important to the history of the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration located in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica. In December 2013, the trust found 22 relatively intact negatives at the Scott site, left by the Shackleton expedition, some of which showed McMurdo Sound landmarks. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of one of the craziest tractors you'll ever see.

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Work on the Eiffel Tower's foundations started on January, 28 1887. The foundations were complete by June 30 and the erection of the ironwork began. The very visible work on-site was complemented by the enormous amount of exacting preparatory work that was entailed: the drawing office produced 1,700 general drawings and 3,629 detailed drawings of the 18,038 different parts needed. The critical stage of joining the four legs at the first level was complete by the end of March 1888. Although construction involved 300 on-site employees, only one person died thanks to Eiffel's stringent safety precautions and use of movable stagings, guard-rails, and screens. Continue reading for more rare photographs from the past you might not have seen before.

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Ever wonder what the United States Hotel Saratoga Springs at Broadway in New York looked like sometime between the years of 1900-1915? This stunning colorized photo shows just that. Hand-colored photographs (often combined with sepia-toning) are still popular for aesthetic reasons and because the pigments used have great permanence. Digital image processing has been used in recent times to recreate the appearance and effects of hand-coloring, with colorization now available to the amateur photographer using image manipulation software such as Adobe Photoshop. Continue reading for more.

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Photo credit: Sniper98g / Reddit

From the outside, it looks like any other old shed, but when you step foot inside, you'll see that it contains a set of stairs leading down to a creepy place to say the least. It's actually a cold war-era bunker discovered by Reddit user Sniper98g. He made the discovery of this "phone booth-sized metal shack in a disused corner of a military base" and decided to take a series of photos to show the world in case he was never found again. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Here is a rare look at the earliest color photographs of the United States. These are all from the Detroit Photographic Company's archives that reveal America in brilliant color from the late 1880s to the early 1920s. My Modern Met says that, "Several thousand black-and-white negatives were reproduced in color by a photolithographic technique invented in Switzerland, called the Photochrom process." Above, we have Mulberry Street in New York, taken in 1900. Continue reading for more.

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Here's one game console you may have never seen or heard about: the Gizmondo. Released by Tiger Telematics in March 2005, it was a popular topic among gamers due to its unique features such as Bluetooth, a 1.3-megapixel camera, SMS & MMS, GPS and GPRS. With fewer than 25,000 units sold, the Gizmondo was named by GamePro as the worst selling handheld console in history. By February 2006, the company was forced into bankruptcy and the Gizmondo was discontinued. Continue reading for more failed game consoles you might not have seen before.

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What you see above is Leo the Lion, the mascot for the Hollywood film studio Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, featured in the studio's production logo, which was created by the Paramount Studios art director Lionel S. Reiss. Since 1924, there have been around seven different lions used for the MGM logo; these lions include Tanner and Leo, the current (and seventh) lion. Tanner was used on all Technicolor films and MGM cartoons, and in use on the studio logo for 22 years; Leo has been in use since 1957, a total of 57 years and counting. Continue reading for more interesting historical photos that are worth a second look.

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