tech e blog

Amelia Earhart Leica Camera

Amelia Mary Earhart, born July 24, 1897 and disappeared July 2, 1937, was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, as well as being known for writing best-selling books about her flying experiences. She was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots, and now, her personal Leica camera could be yours, if the price is right. "I'm selling Amelia Earhart's camera which was gifted by her to a family member in 1933 after returning back from a trip to Chicago with her husband. The camera has been in my family possession since that time and has been in long term storage, the camera appears to be working correctly. The hand signed card was personally signed by Amelia and given to my grandfather, along with the camera by Amelia Earhart back in 1933 in Rye, New York," said the seller. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Tesla Vintage Ad

Photo credit: Invaluable via Bored Panda

Did you know that electric vehicles first appeared in the mid-19th century? Or that one even held the vehicular land speed record until around 1900? Unfortunately, the high cost and short battery range led to a worldwide decline in their use; although electric vehicles have continued to be used in the form of electric trains as well as other niche uses. Continue reading to see how more modern products and services would look in 1950s-style ads.

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JVC Videosphere

The space helmet-inspired JVC Videosphere just might be the strangest CRT television ever. It made its debut in 1970 and was sold up until the early-1980s. In addition to the white, red, black and orange colors, buyers could also opt for an alarm clock base. Due to its sci-fi look, a red model appear as a background prop in the 1999 film The Matrix, though they have appeared in sci-fi films since the early 70s. Continue reading for another video and more information.

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First GoPro Camera

The GoPro Fusion is capable of capturing spherical video, but long before this innovation, there was this camera, first released on April 13, 2005. It measured in at 2.5" x 3", weighed 0.45-pounds, and included a quick release clear case, camera strap and ski glove adapter lash. The camera could also pivot "on the fly" and is functional at a maximum water depth of about 15-feet. The device was marketed as a "reusable wrist camera" and included a roll of 24 exposure Kodak 400 film. Continue reading for another video, more pictures and information.

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Jaguar XJR-15

Before the iconic XJ220 supercar, there was the sleek Jaguar XJR-15, which was first released in 1991 and limited to just 53-units worldwide. It was the first street legal production car to boast a carbon fiber monocoque, and the one you see above has just 600-miles on the odometer. This mid-engine vehicle was originally exported to Germany and kept in storage for 17-years, until it was sent to the UK with a mere 250 miles on the odometer. Continue reading for another video, more pictures and information.

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Camera Photo 1890s

Photo credit: Bored Panda

Carl Stormer (1872-1957), a then 19-year-old student, enjoyed photography during the 1890s, and decided to stroll around Oslo, Norway with a spy camera of sorts to and secretly capture candid photos of people. He received his C.P. Stirn Concealed Vest Spy Camera in 1893 while studying mathematics at the Royal Frederick University - currently the University of Oslo. "It was a round flat canister hidden under the vest with the lens sticking out through a buttonhole. Under my clothes I had a string down through a hole in my trouser pocket, and when I pulled the string the camera took a photo," said Stromer. Continue reading for more pictures and a bonus video. Click here for a few bonus images.

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Star Wars Cast 1977


Many have watched Star Wars: A New Hope dozens of times or more, but the colorized image above provides a look at the original cast out of costume during a 1977 photo shoot. Plus, did you know that it was only screened in about 50 theaters when it first opened? In comparson, The Phantom Menace opened in nearly 3,000 in 1999. Or, that before the movie opened, there was a theft issue at the production offices. As the hype built, people were desperate for Star Wars memorabilia and information. Thousands of color transparencies were stolen, and at the time, the going rate for a black-market purchases was $5 each. Continue reading for more incredible colorized historical photos from much simpler times.

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Eiffel Tower Then Now

Photo credit: Bored Panda

Constructed between the years of 1887-89, it was designed to be the 1889 World's Fair entrance, and is currently the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people climbed it in 2015. Due to the addition of a broadcasting aerial at the top of the tower in 1957, it is now taller than the Chrysler Building by 17-feet. Excluding transmitters, the Eiffel Tower is the second-tallest structure in France after the Millau Viaduct. Continue reading for more photos that show how famous landmarks changed over time.

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Codex Seraphinianus


Codex Seraphinianus, originally published in 1981, is basically an illustrated encyclopedia of an imaginary world, created by the Italian artist, architect, and industrial designer Luigi Serafini during thirty months, from 1976 to 1978. It's approximately 360 pages long, and written in a cipher alphabet in a constructed language. The language of the book has defied complete analysis by linguists for decades. The illustrations are often surreal parodies of things in the real world: bleeding fruit; a plant that grows into roughly the shape of a chair and is subsequently made into one. Click here for the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for the five most popular viral videos today, including one of a master craftsman making a natural draft furnace using primitive technology.

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Steve Jobs Macintosh

Photo credit: Norman Seeff

Photographer Norman Seeff released a few rarely seen outtakes of Steve Jobs from a 1984 photo shoot with the Macintosh design team. This is the same shoot that produced the iconic photo of Steve Jobs holding a Mac on his lap, which was on the cover of Time Magazine and the book jacket of Walter Isaacson's biography. His aim was to portray a personable side of the young Steve Jobs, rather than show him as a demanding leader. Continue reading for more rarely seen historical photos.

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