tech e blog

At CES 2014, 3D Systems unveiled a new line of ChefJet 3D printers designed specifically for food items. The countertop ChefJet 3D printer (8x8x6") can only print in one color, while the ChefJet Pro 3D printer (10x14x8") is good for a multitude of colors. You can use them to create chocolate, vanilla, mint, sour apple, cherry and even watermelon flavored sugar cubes. Continue reading for a video, more pictures and additional information.

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Geeks not only shop at stores, but if they're traveling or are visiting a unique store, a camera (or smartphone) is always in hand. Sometimes, they come across strange people in stores (namely WalMart) or in this case, extremely strange food products names - some may be perfectly normal when translated, but in English mean something entirely different. Starting off, we have some packaged noodles with a name that cannot be explained, at all. Continue reading for more.

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Designer and geek Chris Dimino didn't want to see his Coronamatic typewriter go to waste, so he transformed it into a fully-functional waffle maker. Simply put, he took a few parts, custom fabricated a few and turned this ancient typewriter into a modern day waffle iron. Unfortunately, this design has not been put into mass production. Continue reading for more cool and geeky breakfast gadgets.

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Have you ever come across a wedding cake that looked too cool to eat? If not, here are a few that might fall under that category, starting with this LEGO creation. It features what appears to be a minifig peeling back layers of frosting to reveal the colorful bricks underneath. Other examples include: Walking Dead, Doctor Who, and much more. Continue reading to see them all.

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Having your drink made slightly wrong probably isn't a big deal, just imagine going home and finding out the barista spelled "Zach" as "Tsach" on top of that. Unfortunately (or fortunately), that is just one of the many name FAILS you'll find here today. Others include: "Rory" instead of "Laurie" and "Juanica" instead of "Monica". On a side note, did you know that Starbucks was named after Starbuck, a character in Herman Melville's novel Moby Dick? That's right, according to CEO Howard Schultz, this nautical theme extended to the company's logo as well and was inspired by a 16th-century Norse print of a "two-tailed mermaid, or siren." Continue reading to see them all.

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Photo credit: Zuzia Kozerska

Zuzia Kozerska, a designer from Poland, managed to combine modern technology with a traditional kitchen tool by using a laser-cutting machine. In other words, she used the machines to engrave fun designs onto rolling pins which can then be used to make some very creative baked goods, including cookies. There are a variety of geometric patterns, animals and even custom-engraved versions should you so desire one. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Hasan Kale, an extremely talented artist from Turkey, creates miniature works of art using just a finely tipped paint brush on everyday objects, such as butterfly wings and snail shells and, more. For his latest series, he has begun using unexpected food surfaces, like chocolates. Each of these tiny masterpieces, painted layer by layer, feature at least one scene from the artist's Istanbul home. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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No your eyes aren't playing tricks, that really is a cafe designed to look like a giant camera. Dreaming Camera is located in the breathtaking countryside of Yangpyeong County in South Korea. It was built by a photography enthusiast who lives in a bungalow right next to the cafe. The design is reminiscent of a Rolleiflex camera, with two floors boasting high panoramic, round windows. Continue reading for more.

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Throw out all you know about cake cutting, as London-based mathematician Alex Bellos shows us a 100-year-old trick that shows why we should be cutting them in lines so the whole cake can be sealed and stored. That's right, the trick was first published in Nature on December 20, 906 in the letters to the editor section by English mathematical scientist Francis Galton. Continue reading for the video and more information.

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Today, Starbucks announced that it will provide a free, online college education to all of its workers, without requiring that they remain with the company, through a partnership with Arizona State University. This offer is open to any of its 135,000 U.S. employees that work at least 20 hours a week and have the grades and test scores to gain admission to Arizona State. For a barista with at least two years of college credit, the company will pay full tuition; for those with fewer credits it will pay part of the cost, but even for many of them, courses will be free, with government and university aid. Continue reading for more information.

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