tech e blog

Dumpster Home

Dr. Jeff Wilson has been living in a 33-square-foot dumpster for The Dumpster Project since February 4, 2014. It's essentially an ongoing experiment in minimalism at the Huston-Tillotson University in Austin, Texas. He plans on upgrading the dumpster through three phases: dumpster camping, average American dumpster home, and uber dumpster. This current phase (phase two) features air conditioning, basic appliances and amenities, and water and power connections. Continue reading to see how it stands today.

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Why Tattoos Hurt

One geek decided to visit a tattoo parlor with a Phantom high-speed camera in-hand to record a video showing why getting these body modifications hurt. Technically speaking, the machine's needles move in an up-and-down motion, carefully pushing the ink just below the surface of the skin. Since damage to your skin is minimal, many people don't bleed at all. On top of that, the tattooist will also be constantly wiping up your skin to clean off any traces of blood. Continue reading for more interesting facts.

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Gallium

Gallium is one of the few metals (if not the only) that can melt in your hand at room temperature, or a balmy 85° F to be exact, but unfortunately, it does not occur in nature. It was first discovered in 1875 and at lower temperatures, gallium is a fragile solid. Practical uses include: high temperature thermometers, metal alloy preparation, microwave circuitry and infrared applications. Product page. Click here to view the first image in this week's funny Facebook status updates gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of an employee at a warehouse store that really knows how to entertain customers.

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Crazy Australia

The Huntsman Spider (above) is common to Australia, but also in many warm-temperate-to-tropical parts of the world. As adults, huntsman spiders do not build webs, but hunt and forage for food: their diet consists primarily of insects and other invertebrates, and occasionally small skinks and geckos. They live in the crevices of tree bark, but will frequently wander into homes and vehicles. Continue reading for more crazy things you will probably only see in Australia.

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Funny Work Picture

File these under: FAILS. You can tell when someone has given up on their jobs, when...they're photographed playing Solitaire instead of helping customers. Other examples of people giving up on their jobs include: an airline employee using a cookie cutter letter without putting in the proper words / names, forgetting what bananas are called, running out of hand towels, and lots more. Continue reading to see them all.

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Strange Cool Google Earth

Want to go on a virtual trip around the world? There's no better place to do so than with Google Earth (and Maps). Thanks to Street View and other technologies, you're able to walk the streets as if you were actually there, minus any moving cars or people. Above, we see a herd of water buffalo at the Kigosi Game Reserve in Tanzania (4°17'21.49 S, 31°23'46.46 E). Continue reading for more.

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Cool Unusual Vending Machines

Did you know that the first commercial coin operated vending machines were introduced in London, England in the early 1880s for the convenience of busy and hungry businessmen? Or, that the word "vending" in vending machine comes from the term for automatic retailing, from a machine? With that said, there are many cool and unusual vending machines from around the world. Our favorite? Definitely the "Let's Pizza" made from scratch pies. Click here to view the first image in today's viral picture gallery. Continue reading for a viral video of a puppy that apparently is an expert at "Cat Fishing 2" for the iPad. In the early 1920s, the first vending machine that sold soda dispensed it into a cup.

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Plutonium

Plutonium is basically a radioactive chemical element, an actinide metal of silvery-gray appearance, that tarnishes when exposed to air, and forms a dull coating when oxidized. Both plutonium-239 and plutonium-241 are fissile, meaning that they can sustain a nuclear chain reaction, leading to applications in nuclear weapons and nuclear reactors. According to the team at Chemicool, it will cost you $4,000 per gram. Continue reading for more.

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Waterfall Restaurant

Dining at a nice restaurant is good enough for most people, but for those who demand an extreme restaurant experience, look no further than the Villa Escudero Waterfall Restaurant. Located in San Pablo City, Philippines, this unique restaurant lets guests get up close and personal with a real roaring waterfall while enjoying their a tasty meal. The dining area sits at the foot of the Labasin Falls, and afterwards, guests can even lie against the rushing water covered wall for quick massage or post-lunch rinse off. Continue reading for another video, more images and additional information.

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Deep Sea Dragonfish

The Deep-sea Dragonfish, as the name states, lives in the deep-sea of the Pacific ocean. The Dragon fish tends to live around 1000 to 3000 meters below the surface. Some Dragonfish have even been found at depths of 5000 meters. Most deep sea fish that can produce light produce blue light, but the dragon fish can produce not only blue light but a red light as well. This red light is emitted from a suborbital photophore. Continue reading for more interesting facts.

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