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Time toToast Smartphone Sanitizer
Photo credit: Lee Sungwook via Yanko Design
Sure, being out in the sun can kill novel coronavirus on frequently touched surfaces or objects, like a smartphone, but what about when you’re inside? Introducing Time to Toast. Simply place you smartphone in the slot, press the handle down, and you have a clean device in about 10-minutes. Yes, the UV light will kill all viruses on the surfaces of your device. Read more for additional pictures and information.

Trinity Nuclear Bomb Photo
Photo credit: Unilad Tech
Ever wonder what the first detonation of a nuclear device looked like? If so, the test codenamed “Trinity” and conducted by the United States Army at 5:29 a.m. on July 16, 1945, as part of the Manhattan Project. It happened in the Jornada del Muerto desert approximately 35-miles southeast of Socorro, New Mexico, on the former USAAF Alamogordo Bombing and Gunnery Range, now part of White Sands Missile Range. Read more for a video and additional information.

Norimaki Synthesizer Taste Device
Ever wish you could taste all of the delicious food you see online? Well, that may become a reality sooner than later, thanks to a novel taste display proposed by Japanese researchers at Meiji University. This device uses ion electrophoresis spread across five gels containing electrolytes that supply controlled amounts of each of the five basic tastes. When an electric current flows through it, an arbitrary taste is applied to the user’s tongue, similar to how modern displays are able to produce multiple shades using three basic colors (RGB). Read more for a video and additional information.

NASA Lemur Robot
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Limbed Excursion Mechanical Utility Robot (LEMUR) was initially designed to make repairs on the International Space Station, but after that program ended, it has its sights set much higher. Engineers are testing the robot and using the gathered data with LEMUR to further explore robots that will eventually land on Mars and beyond. Read more for a video and additional information.

SAHM Splice Swaging Machine Steel Rope
Ever wonder how they compress and combine steel rope? If so, then you’ll be glad to know that it’s most likely a SAHM splice swaging machine. The term “swage” derives from the Old French term souage, meaning “decorative groove” or “ornamental moulding”. They were originally tools used by blacksmiths to form metal into different shapes that are too intricate to make with just a hammer alone. Read more for a video and additional information.

1980 Eruption of Mount St. Helens Volcano Anniversary
Today marks 40-years since the eruption of Mount St. Helens shortly after 8:30 a.m. on May 18, 1980. For a period of two months preceding the event, there were over 2,800 earthquakes recorded at Mount St. Helens, which eventually caused a volcanic bulge to landslide down the mountain, reducing the its height by 1,314 feet. Read more for some video footage of the fateful event and additional information.

NASA Parallel Universe Multiverse
NASA scientists have allegedly discovered evidence of a parallel universe located right next to ours, where all the rules of physics seem to be operating in reverse. This finding came about when the team used NASA’s Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) to conduct an experiment in Antarctica, and found particles that might be from outside our own universe. Read more for two videos and additional information.

Caltech Fastest Camera 70-Trillion
A research team led by Lihong Wang at Caltech’s Andrew and Peggy Cherng Department of Medical Engineering have developed an ultra fast camera that is capable of taking as many as 70 trillion frames per second. In other words, it’s fast enough to see waves of light traveling and the fluorescent decay of molecules. Read more for another picture and additional information.

Poplar Fluff Burning Spain
Your eyes aren’t playing tricks, in certain places around the world, spring not only brings good weather, but also a blanket of fluffy material from trees, better known as poplar fluff. This comes from the fast-growing balsam poplar, which can be either male and female, but only the latter produces fluff with seeds. Many experts recommend to planting just the male poplar to prevent the fluff from spreading allergenic pollen and dust. Read more for the video and additional information.

Deep Sea Snail Iron Shell
The bizarre-looking deep sea snail boasts a unique three-layered shell that can easily fend off attacks from crabs as well as protect it from high temperatures. They’re currently known to exist around four hydrothermal vents in the Indian Ocean where temperatures can reach up to 750 degrees Fahrenheit. Its outer layer of its shell is made from iron sulfide, creating a suit of armor around its vitals. Read more for a video and additional information.