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Our editors have compiled a list of seven high-tech cell phones you can't buy, or at least anytime soon, for your viewing enjoyment. If we happened to miss any, please leave us a comment. "Continue reading" for the list.

Pantech's Flexus Mobile Phone

Pantech's sleek "Flexus" mobile phone concept recently took home the iF Design Award for Excellence & Innovation. This handset boasts a "trackball and Moto PEBL-esque keypad." [Source 1 - 2]

NEC's "Tag" Phone

NEC has just unveiled "Tag", its next-generation cell phone concept. Available in white, black, or orange varities, this device boasts '"shape-memorizing" material -- the tag will bend and twist at your command.' Other specifications have not yet been released. [Source]

Nokia Aeon

Similar to the Synaptics Onyx, the Nokia Aeon features a "full surface touchscreen" display that replaces the traditional keypad.
Currently mobile technology isn't quite up to realizing this fantasy, but we'll sleep better tonight knowing that at least one of the cellphone industry's biggest names shares the same dream as we do
[Source]

Synaptics Onyx Mobile

Synaptics introduces the Onyx mobile phone concept, which comes equipped with a touch-sensitive LCD panel instead of a regular keypad, allowing you to answer the handset "by simply holding it to your cheek, messages sent by swiping them off the screen with the whole finger. [Source 1 - 2]

Pantech Pivot Point

Designed by Lunar Designs for Pantech, Pivot Point is a futuristic mobile phone concept, sporting a "swiveling screen that can be set up like an easel for easy typing."
If it ever gets out of the design stage, the device is sure to be a hit with mobile TV and video-conferencing junkies
[Source]

Motorola PVOT Phone

Designed for developing nations, the Motorola PVOT concept is a hand crank, rechargeable AA battery-powered phone. You get one minute of use for every 25 cranks. Other features include a 125 x 125 Dot Matrix LCD and an "Eraser Shield" keypad.
"Bridging the digital and wireless communication gap in developing countries" The PVOT is intended as a lower tier phone
[Source]

Dual-Screen Cell Phone

Alloy Total Product Design's "The Polygon" boasts two displays: a standard high-resolution display for viewing data and a touchscreen for accessing menus, etc.
If you wish to watch television, or browse the net, this is the screen that'll display all of the video and pictures. The second screen is sensitive to the touch, and is thus a lot more durable. This is the screen used for navigation of the various features and media available on The Polygon
[Source]







This entry was posted on 01/02/2007 06:13am and is filed under Cell Phones, Video .
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