Making its debut in August 1976, the Fairchild Channel F was “the world’s second cartridge-based video game console” and retailed at $169.95. This console was “based on the Fairchild F8 CPU, invented by Robert Noyce before he left Fairchild to start his own company, Intel. The F8 was very complex compared to the typical integrated circuits of the day, and had more inputs and outputs than other contemporary chips.” Video after the jump.

Because chip packaging was not available with enough pins, the F8 was instead fabricated as a pair of chips that had to be used together to form a complete CPU. The video was quite basic, although it was in color which was a large step forward from the contemporary PONG machines. Sound was played through an internal speaker, rather than the TV set

Making its debut in August 1976, the Fairchild Channel F was “the world’s second cartridge-based video game console” and retailed at $169.95. This console was “based on the Fairchild F8 CPU, invented by Robert Noyce before he left Fairchild to start his own company, Intel. The F8 was very complex compared to the typical integrated circuits of the day, and had more inputs and outputs than other contemporary chips.” Video after the jump.

Because chip packaging was not available with enough pins, the F8 was instead fabricated as a pair of chips that had to be used together to form a complete CPU. The video was quite basic, although it was in color which was a large step forward from the contemporary PONG machines. Sound was played through an internal speaker, rather than the TV set