Skin Gun

Here’s another look at the ground-breaking ReCell Skin Gun, which works essentially like a sophisticated spray paint gun. Developed by Professor Joerg C. Gerlach and colleages of the Department of Surgery at the University of Pittsburg’s McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, this method uses an aerosol system to spray on cultured skin cells, and cuts healing time to days rather than weeks or months. It uses an electronically controlled pneumatic device that does not injure the cells, while the other skin spraying devices are hand-pumped atomizers. The process, where a biopsy is taken from the patient’s undamaged skin and then healthy stem cells are isolated from the biopsy and an aqueous solution containing the cells is sprayed on the burn, takes just 1.5-hours. Continue reading for another video of the process and more information.

Next, the sprayed wound is covered with a newly-developed dressing with tubes enmeshed within it, extending from each end. One set of these tubes works as an artery, while the second set functions as a vein. They are connected to an “artificial vascular system” and provide electrolytes, antibiotics, amino acids and glucose to the wound. The dressing keeps the wound clean and sterile, and provides nutrition for the skin stem cells to encourage them to regenerate new skin. Once treatment is complete, it only takes days to completely heal instead of weeks using traditional treatments.