Pong may have been one of the first arcade games released, but that hasn’t stopped these gamers from inventing new ways to play the timeless classic. Continue reading to see them all. Click here for first picture in gallery.

Flashlight Pong

Display22 puts a new twist on the classic game of Pong by adding a new level of interactivity — using flashlights to control the paddles. The entire surface of the screen was fitted with light-tracking sensors to follow movement.

Concretely, Flashlight Pong should be playable in the input area on the display installed

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Pong Wall

Fans demonstrated this nifty touch-sensitive “Pong Wall” at Nextfest. This interactive installation uses embedded sensors to detect hand movements and LEDs for displaying the score/information.

Atari has brought PONG back…only this time the game is projected on a wall and players use their hands to move the virtual paddles along the game board. The hand movement is picked up by cameras stationed next to the projector

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Bongo Pong

Bongo Pongo is a custom version of Pong, which lets players use a platform-type device to control movement. Though it does seem a bit challenging to stay on the platform, we recommend wearing kneepads.

For $6 I was able to get a short length of 5″ PVC pipe and a piece of wood (which I later replaced with the skateboard deck seen in the video below), and some small metal tubes to use for the tilt activated switches


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Electro-Mechanical Pong

Yes, this version of Pong is 100% electro-mechanical. The playing field consists of a ball and paddles that are attached to servo controlled cables, sandwiched between two sheets of glass. Instead of microcontrollers and integrated circuits, Pongmechanik uses three sensors to determine mechanical movement. Players use the joystick to drive a relay computer (simple logic circuit).

“The score counters go from 1 to 5 and the numbers are displayed on two rotating discs; as soon as a player gets five points, the game resets. The sound effects (all two of them) are created using solenoid plungers.”

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