According to Steve Mark, the Toroidal Power Unit “supposedly harnesses the power of the electromagnetic field of the Earth, via an unconventional toroidal wire configuration, with no moving parts. The device’s operation is accompanied by a slight gyroscopic mechanical force, and slight noise.”

Well narrated by Steve Mark, shows three devices. Small (6″ diam x 2″ high x 1″ thick toroid) solid-state prototype is shown powering a 100W bulb directly, and through an inverter: a 3-amp drill, a television, a vacuum. Harnesses power of electromagnetic field. Larger unit puts out 7 amps; could power an electric vehicle

According to Steve Mark, the Toroidal Power Unit “supposedly harnesses the power of the electromagnetic field of the Earth, via an unconventional toroidal wire configuration, with no moving parts. The device’s operation is accompanied by a slight gyroscopic mechanical force, and slight noise.”

Well narrated by Steve Mark, shows three devices. Small (6″ diam x 2″ high x 1″ thick toroid) solid-state prototype is shown powering a 100W bulb directly, and through an inverter: a 3-amp drill, a television, a vacuum. Harnesses power of electromagnetic field. Larger unit puts out 7 amps; could power an electric vehicle