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Tesla Dog Mode
Tesla officially revealed a new feature, called “Dog Mode”, that aims to keep pet owners comfortable while they’re left unattended in the vehicle. How does it work? Simply put, it keeps climate control on while the car is parked and also includes a display screen with the temperature so passerby by can see that the pets are safe. To enable this mode, owners simply tap on a fan icon at the bottom of the touch screen, and if the car’s battery reaches less than 20 percent charge, owners will receive a notification on their mobile app. Read more for a video of the new feature and additional information.

Japanese Spider Crab Moulting
SeaWorld San Diego has just posted a fascinating time-lapse video of a Japanese spider crab shedding its old shell, and despite the clip being just 25-seconds long, the actual process took over six hours and enables the animal to eat more as well as grow larger. “It’s a perfectly natural occurrence for a spider crab. But for us as marine scientists to be able to witness Mother Nature in action in such an impressive way, that’s a great day at SeaWorld,” said aquarium curator Mike Price. Read more to watch.

Octopus Steals Camera
Photographer Victor Huang wanted to test out his new Panasonic Lumix camera while swimming in the waters o Wahine Memorial, Wellington, New Zealand, but little did he know that the large wild octopus he encountered would lead him on a different kind of journey. This octopus snagged the camera from his hands and swam away with it while still recording the movie-worthy chase. Read more to see what happened next.

Arctic Fox Photographer Camera

Photo credit: Stefan Forster via Peta Pixel
Stefan Forster, a landscape photographer from Switzerland, was shooting in Greenland during September 2018 when he spotted a wild white Arctic Fox. As many already know, most animals shy away from humans, but after hiding and crawling for about 3,300 feet, this majestic animal encounter happened, and it was all captured in a 50-second video. Read more for another video and additional pictures.

Axolotl Salamander Regeneration

Photo credit: Christian Baker
The axolotl is a Mexican salamander with incredible regenerative abilities, which means you can slice off its leg off, and the limb will grow right back, exactly the way it was. How they’re able to do this and humans can’t is still a mystery to researchers. “It’s hard to find a body part they can’t regenerate: the limbs, the tail, the spinal cord, the eye, and in some species, the lens, even half of their brain has been shown to regenerate,” said study co-lead author Randal Voss, a professor at the University of Kentucky Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center. Read more for another video and additional information.

Shark Galaga

Photo credit: Terry Gates / Gizmodo
Galagadon, a freshwater shark from the Cretaceous Period, is related to a group called carpet sharks found in Indo-Pacific seas today, and measured 1-2 feet in length, with teeth the size of a sand grain, about four-hundredths of an inch (1 millimeter). However, these teeth are shaped just like the spaceships found in the 1981 Japanese arcade game Galaga, which is the sequel to 1979’s Galaxian. Read more for an artist’s depiction of an actual Galagadon shark.

Robot Scientist Amniote

Photo credit: Geek.com
Ever wonder how the earliest land animals moved? If so, you’ll be glad to know that scientists, led by evolutionary biologist John Nyakatura at Humboldt University in Berlin, have used a 290-million-year old fossil skeleton to create a moving robot model of prehistoric life. This four-legged plant-eater lived before the dinosaurs and believed to be called a “stem amniote”, or an early land-dwelling animal that later evolved into modern mammals. It fascinates scientists “because of its position on the tree of life,” said Nyakatura. The team partnered with robotics expert Kamilo Melo at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne to develop a model of how the creature moved before building OroBOT. This robot is made of motors connected by 3D-printed plastic and steel parts and “helps us to test real-world dynamics, to account for gravity and friction,” said Melo. Read more for a compilation of interesting images gathered from around the web.

Honeybee Defense Wave
A new video, captured in Vietnam, has surfaced that shows honeybees performing an audio-like defense wave to ward off wasps. This technique, officially known as ‘shimmering’, where the hive is made to look as though it is performing a Mexican wave, involves the bees pushing their abdomens up into the air. To be more specific, each honeybee surrounding outer layer of the hive lifts their abdomen to create a ripple effect from one end of to the other for a shimmer-like effect. Read more for the video and additional information.

Cats Turned Anime Characters
Photo credit: Xuedaixun via Bored Panda
Let’s face it, many social media users go on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc. to look at animal pictures, but China-based artist “Xuedaixun” does so for an entirely different reason. This person grabs the most popular photos on these networks and transforms them into anime-inspired human characters, both cats and dogs. For the most part, the poses are kept, and in some cases, even the hairstyle. Read more to see some of the artist’s most popular works.

Ford Dog House Kennel
Ford has created a prototype quiet kennel for dogs by using Active Noise Control technology designed for high-end vehicles sold in Europe. Why? Veterinarians have urged people to find quiet space for their pets because holiday fireworks can terrify the animal, which may cause them to run away, get hit by cars, develop anxiety and stress that can lead to injury and self harm. This quiet kennel detects noise and transmits opposing frequencies, complete with a soundproofing component as well as an automatic door. Read more for the video, additional pictures and information.