Created by Viktor Zykov, this autonomous Starfish robot “works out its own model of itself and can revise the model to adapt to injury: first, it teaches itself to walk; then, when damaged, it teaches itself to limp.” Video after the jump.

The underlying algorithm, the researchers said, could be applied to much more complex machines and also could allow robots to adapt to changes in environment and repair themselves by replacing parts. The work also could have other applications in computing and could lead to better understanding of animal cognition. In a way, Bongard said, the robot is “conscious” on a primitive level, because it thinks to itself, “What would happen if I do this?”

Created by Viktor Zykov, this autonomous Starfish robot “works out its own model of itself and can revise the model to adapt to injury: first, it teaches itself to walk; then, when damaged, it teaches itself to limp.” Video after the jump.

The underlying algorithm, the researchers said, could be applied to much more complex machines and also could allow robots to adapt to changes in environment and repair themselves by replacing parts. The work also could have other applications in computing and could lead to better understanding of animal cognition. In a way, Bongard said, the robot is “conscious” on a primitive level, because it thinks to itself, “What would happen if I do this?”