So you’ve read about the partial invisibility cloak, now check out the first demonstration — conducted by scientists at Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering. This cloak basically “deflects microwave beams so they flow around a “hidden” object inside with little distortion, making it appear almost as if nothing were there at all.” Video after the jump. What are your thoughts?

“By incorporating complex material properties, our cloak allows a concealed volume, plus the cloak, to appear to have properties similar to free space when viewed externally,” said David R. Smith, Augustine Scholar and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke. “The cloak reduces both an object’s reflection and its shadow, either of which would enable its detection.”

So you’ve read about the partial invisibility cloak, now check out the first demonstration — conducted by scientists at Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering. This cloak basically “deflects microwave beams so they flow around a “hidden” object inside with little distortion, making it appear almost as if nothing were there at all.” Video after the jump. What are your thoughts?

“By incorporating complex material properties, our cloak allows a concealed volume, plus the cloak, to appear to have properties similar to free space when viewed externally,” said David R. Smith, Augustine Scholar and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke. “The cloak reduces both an object’s reflection and its shadow, either of which would enable its detection.”