Scientists at Brown University have managed to capture the movement of a single electron on video. Continue reading to watch,

…looked at electrons moving though supercooled liquid helium, which has very little surface tension…Then, they blasted the fluid with sound waves, which alternately increased and decreased the pressure of the fluid, allowing some of the electron bubbles to expand to about the size of a speck of dust, which were made visible by combining a strobe light with a home video camera on “super night mode.”

[via OhGizmo!]

Scientists at Brown University have managed to capture the movement of a single electron on video. Continue reading to watch,

…looked at electrons moving though supercooled liquid helium, which has very little surface tension…Then, they blasted the fluid with sound waves, which alternately increased and decreased the pressure of the fluid, allowing some of the electron bubbles to expand to about the size of a speck of dust, which were made visible by combining a strobe light with a home video camera on “super night mode.”

[via OhGizmo!]