Microsoft’s innovative PlayTogether system uses “two networked table-top systems to let people play a virtual game of chess in two locations, using real pieces and a real board on either end, with each player’s opponent’s pieces projected onto his board.” Continue reading for a demonstration — courtesy of PopularMechanics.

Wilson even demoed a three-dimensional variant of his table-top system (this project didn’t even have a name) that allowed users to put three-dimensional objects on a table top, then drive a virtual computer-based car over them. As the car drove over each object, a separate LCD display showed a 3-D rendered car jumping over instant computer models of the real-world objects that had been placed in its path

Microsoft’s innovative PlayTogether system uses “two networked table-top systems to let people play a virtual game of chess in two locations, using real pieces and a real board on either end, with each player’s opponent’s pieces projected onto his board.” Continue reading for a demonstration — courtesy of PopularMechanics.

Wilson even demoed a three-dimensional variant of his table-top system (this project didn’t even have a name) that allowed users to put three-dimensional objects on a table top, then drive a virtual computer-based car over them. As the car drove over each object, a separate LCD display showed a 3-D rendered car jumping over instant computer models of the real-world objects that had been placed in its path