Our friends over at Kotaku explains the process of how these “Quasi Stop-Motion” clips are made and pointed us to a new Metroid example. Video after the jump. Here’s the process in-detail:

What you can see is a very basic quasi-stop motion animation. Quasi because there was actually only one LEGO block involved, which was photographed in multiple positions and then composited in a photo editing program as a multi-layer image. Producing the animation was then a simple matter of masking the LEGO blocks and then hiding or displaying certain layers. The end result was a simple stop motion animation that didn’t suffer from the usual random variations in lighting and position

[via Kotaku]

Our friends over at Kotaku explains the process of how these “Quasi Stop-Motion” clips are made and pointed us to a new Metroid example. Video after the jump. Here’s the process in-detail:

What you can see is a very basic quasi-stop motion animation. Quasi because there was actually only one LEGO block involved, which was photographed in multiple positions and then composited in a photo editing program as a multi-layer image. Producing the animation was then a simple matter of masking the LEGO blocks and then hiding or displaying certain layers. The end result was a simple stop motion animation that didn’t suffer from the usual random variations in lighting and position

[via Kotaku]