Here’s a rare look at Aquarius, the world’s last undersea laboratory. It’s “most often used by marine biologists for whom Aquarius acts as home base as they study the coral reef, the fish and aquatic plants that live nearby and the composition of the surrounding seawater.” Continue reading for a video, more pictures, and additional information.

Video

Aquarius consists of three compartments. Access to the water is made via the ‘wet porch’, a chamber equipped with a moon pool, which keeps the air pressure inside the wet porch the same as the water pressure at that depth (‘ambient pressure’), about 2.6 atmospheres, through hydrostatic equilibrium.

The main compartment is strong enough, like a submarine, to maintain normal atmospheric pressure, and can also be pressurized to ambient pressure, and is usually held at a pressure in between. The smallest compartment, the Entry Lock, is between the other two and functions as an airlock in which personnel wait while pressure is adjusted to match either the wet porch or the main compartment. This design enables personnel to return to the surface without the need for a decompression chamber when they get there. Personnel stay inside the main compartment for 17 hours before ascending as the pressure is slowly reduced, so that they do not suffer decompression sickness after the ascent.

Pictures

[Sources 1 | 2]