One of our readers just sent in an interesting (scientific) video clip that shows what happens when you combine dry ice with liquid soap. Watch after the jump.

Dry ice is produced by compressing carbon dioxide gas to a liquid form, removing the heat produced by the compression (see Charles’s law), and then letting the liquid carbon dioxide expand quickly. This expansion and the high-speed evaporation of carbon dioxide gas cools the remainder of the liquid down to the melting point, where some of the CO2 freezes into ‘snow,’ which is then compressed into pellets or blocks

One of our readers just sent in an interesting (scientific) video clip that shows what happens when you combine dry ice with liquid soap. Watch after the jump.

Dry ice is produced by compressing carbon dioxide gas to a liquid form, removing the heat produced by the compression (see Charles’s law), and then letting the liquid carbon dioxide expand quickly. This expansion and the high-speed evaporation of carbon dioxide gas cools the remainder of the liquid down to the melting point, where some of the CO2 freezes into ‘snow,’ which is then compressed into pellets or blocks