The Meissner Effect is basically “when a superconductor is placed in a weak external magnetic field H — the field penetrates the superconductor for only a short distance λ, called the penetration depth, after which it decays rapidly to zero.” Video demonstration after the jump.

The Meissner effect is sometimes confused with the kind of diamagnetism one would expect in a perfect electrical conductor: according to Lenz’s law, when a changing magnetic field is applied to a conductor, it will induce an electrical current in the conductor that creates an opposing magnetic field

The Meissner Effect is basically “when a superconductor is placed in a weak external magnetic field H — the field penetrates the superconductor for only a short distance λ, called the penetration depth, after which it decays rapidly to zero.” Video demonstration after the jump.

The Meissner effect is sometimes confused with the kind of diamagnetism one would expect in a perfect electrical conductor: according to Lenz’s law, when a changing magnetic field is applied to a conductor, it will induce an electrical current in the conductor that creates an opposing magnetic field