Ok, so technically we can’t call this a crop circle, but it’s probably as close as we’ll ever get to an underwater version. However, as mysterious as it may look, there’s actually a pretty simple explanation for it, and the answer involves fish, or does it? Continue reading for more pictures and information.

Using underwater cameras the team discovered the artist is a small puffer fish only a few inches in length that swims tirelessly through the day and night to create these vast organic sculptures using the gesture of a single fin. Through careful observation the team found the circles serve a variety of crucial ecological functions, the most important of which is to attract mates.

Apparently the female fish are attracted to the hills and valleys within the sand and traverse them carefully to discover the male fish where the pair eventually lay eggs at the circle’s center, the grooves later acting as a natural buffer to ocean currents that protect the delicate offspring. Scientists also learned that the more ridges contained within the sculpture resulted in a much greater likelihood of the fish pairing.

[Sources 1 | 2 | 3]