Boeing T-7A Red Hawk Red Tail Jet
The Boeing T-7A Red Hawk advanced trainer jet has officially been delivered to the U.S. Air Force. What sets this next-generation trainer aircraft apart from the others is that it incorporates a red-tailed livery in honor of the Tuskegee Airmen of World War II who made up the first African American aviation unit to serve in the U.S. military.



This first trainer jet will remain in St. Louis where it will undergo ground and flight tests before being delivered to the U.S. Air Force. Boeing’s T-7A program resides at the company’s St. Louis facility with the aft section of the trainer being built by Saab in Linkoping, Sweden. The same Saab that also manufactures automobiles will soon start fabricating that section at their new production facility in West Lafayette, Indiana. Could you imagine NASA’s Advanced Electric Propulsion System powering one of these jets?

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The Tuskegee Airmen are one of the most celebrated units in our Air Force history, and the T-7A honors the bravery and skill of these trailblazers. Like the Airmen they were named and painted to pay homage to, the T-7A Red Hawks break down the barriers of flight. These digitally-engineered aircraft will make it possible for a diverse cross section of future fighter and bomber pilots to be trained, and provide an advanced training system and capabilities that will meet the demands of today’s and tomorrow’s national security environment,” said Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr., Chief of Staff of the Air Force.

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