Honeypot Ants Species Make Honey
Insect-like robots are military-ready, while honeypot ants are just plain fascinating. Why? They’re the world’s only ant species that make a honey-like substance, as the liquid stored inside them can be used later by their fellow workers when food is otherwise scarce.



They scientifically belong to any of several genera, including Myrmecocystus and Camponotus, with their first discovery being documented in 1881 by Henry C. McCook. The abdomen of these species consists of stiff plates connected by a softer, more flexible arthrodial membrane. You won’t find these in your backyard, as they typically live in a variety of arid or semiarid environments including extremely hot deserts. It’s true, you can safely eat these ants as well, and that’s exactly why they are included in the diet of some Indigenous Australians.

Uncle Milton Giant Ant Farm - Large Viewing Area - Care for Live Ants - Nature Learning Toy - Science DIY Toy Kit - Great Gift for Boys & Girls, Green
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Uncle Milton Giant Ant Farm - Large Viewing Area - Care for Live Ants - Nature Learning Toy - Science DIY Toy Kit - Great Gift for Boys & Girls, Green
  • OBSERVE LIVE ANTS: Dig tunnels, build bridges, move mountains, and so much more!
  • STEM learning toy allows children ages 6 and up to discover the amazing behavior and anatomy of ants.
  • BREAK RESISTANT AND ESCAPE PROOF: A self-locking device that makes it escape-proof and provides easy access for feeding and giving water to the ants.

Honeypot Ants Species Make Honey

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