Skeleton Coast

The Skeleton Coast spans from Namibia to Angola, and sounds like a place you’d find Captain Jack Sparrow hanging out at. The Bushmen of the Namibian Interior call the desolate place “The Land God Made in Anger,” complete with animals remains and rusted boats. The name Skeleton Coast was invented by John Henry Marsh as the title for the book he wrote chronicling the shipwreck of the Dunedin Star. Since the book was first published in 1944 it has become so well known that the coast is now generally referred to as Skeleton Coast and is given that as its official name on most maps today. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

Real Skeleton Coast

On the coast the upwelling of the cold Benguela current gives rise to dense ocean fogs (called “cassimbo” by the Angolans) for much of the year. The winds blow from land to sea, rainfall rarely exceeds 10 millimetres (0.39 in) annually and the climate is highly inhospitable. There is a constant, heavy surf on the beaches. In the days of human-powered boats it was possible to get ashore through the surf but impossible to launch from the shore. The only way out was by going through a marsh hundreds of miles long and only accessible via a hot and arid desert.

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