tech e blog

Underground Home Las Vegas

When it comes to real estate, the most important thing is location, location, location. With that said, where would a paranoid millionaire during the Cold War era build a home? In Las Vegas, Nevada of course, hidden 26-feet below the ground. It's a furnished home, complete with fake clouds. To get there, you go through the completely normal-looking home, which exists as camouflage for the elevator (or stairs) that takes you down into the secret lair. The house has all the hallmarks of 1970s living and should be turned into a museum if nobody decides to shell out the $1.7-million it costs to purchase the unique home. Successful businessman Girard Henderson built the home in 1978 and intended to ride out the end of days in the comfort of his lair. Continue reading for a video, more pictures and additional information.

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Cement Pipes Backyard

When do you do when you need some extra storage space, but only have a giant backyard? You go buy some giant cement pipes, dig a few giant holes, and build cement pipe-based storage units with a few extra stones laid around for show. Want to take his project a bit further? You could possibly connect a few of these together and build a Hobbit-inspired home of sorts for the summer. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Mailman Palace

There are many parts of France that seem to be straight from a fairytale, and one of them is Palais Ideal, a handmade palace by Ferdinand Cheval. This French postman did not have any formal architectural or artistic training, but spent 33-years (beginning at 43-years-old) creating this extraordinary structure. Pebbles and other oddly-shaped rocks that he found along his mail route were stuck together using cement. Construction on the palace began in 1879 and was completed in 1912. Continue reading for another video, more pictures and additional information.

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Snowboarder Home Mountains

Mike Basich, a professional snowboarder from California, has traveled all over the world, but he prefers to live closer to the slopes. So, he built this tiny 225-square-foot home in the middle of his 40-acre property near Truckee, Calif. This project, called "Going off the Grid" took him five years to complete..."two and half years to do all the rock work. I think I moved about 175 ton of rock," according to Basich. Since it's in such a remote location, there's no land-bsaed Internet (satellite still a possibility), no indoor plumbing, and no traditional electricity. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Ski Jump Home

This historic ski jump is unlike any other, as it has been converted into a penthouse apartment suspended 200 feet in the air. The modern living space at the top of the Holmenkollen competitive arena in Norway was previously a waiting area for competitors during the 1952 Winter Olympics. When on the rooftop terrace, guests can catch glimpses of the Northern Lights on clear nights. Continue reading for a video, more pictures and additional information.

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Solar Powered House

You might think this is just another poorly rendered UFO photo, but it's actually a floating, solar-powered home, designed by Italian architect Giancarlo Zema. Called the "Waternest", it spans 1,000-square-feet and is entirely from recycled timber as well as a recycled aluminum hull. There are also skylights, balconies, and large windows that offer panoramic views of the water. Don't worry about electricity, as the roof is one giant solar panel. Continue reading for more pictures.

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Attic Home Conversion

Most attics are dark, dusty and just plain creepy, but interior designer Veneta Nikolova and architect Dimitar Karanikolov have transformed one into Loft 9B, an ultra modern living space in Sofia, Bulgaria. To make the most of a small area, a large dark cube conceals the bathroom that sits on top of the building's elevator shaft, and the cube's walls are just 16mm thin, with custom made concrete panels on the inside. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Urban Tree House

This 5-story apartment building in Turin, Italy is unlike any other because 25 Verde, designed by Luciano Pia, creates a vertical forest, holding 150 trees, that absorb close to 200,000 liters of carbon dioxide an hour, thus bringing pollution protection to its residents. That's not all, it also helps eliminate harmful gasses caused by cars and the loud noises from the traffic. All of the plants' full foliage serve double duty, as they block rays of sun during the summer while letting in warm light during the winter. Continue reading for more pictures and information.

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Skyscraper Time-lapse

No, this isn't some miniature building, or a facade, but a real 57-story skyscraper that was built in just 19-days. Despite measuring in at 2-million-square-foot (180,000-square-meter), energy-efficient, factory-produced LEGO-style blocks enabled the company to accomplish this feat - they can now build three-floors a day. Continue reading for the video and more information.

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The Lotus Building

Not just any building, The Lotus Building, located in the center of the Wujin District in the eastern coastal province of Jiangsu, China, features a unique design that looks just like a real blooming lotus flower. It's surrounded by "petal ribs" that open up, similar to the three stages of a lotus flower, from bud to fully-opened bloom. Inside, there's cathedral-like ceilings, conference rooms, exhibition halls, and offices. Geothermal piles uses the surrounding lake to regulate the building's temperature with minimal energy use. Continue reading for more pictures.

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