Kinetic Touchless Gesture-Controlled Door
H/t: Gizmodo
Stuck Design’s new Kinetic Touchless 2.0 door is controlled with gestures, and to bystanders, it may look like you’re using The Force. How does it work? It uses motion as feedback, so as your hand moves towards the door, it’s activated and responds with a slider interface. You then control the slider at a distance to open the door, and it automatically closes behind after walking through. This means that instead of traditional motion sensors, these only detect the presence of a hand. Read more for a video of it in-action and additional information.



This is aimed at homes, offices and classrooms rather than high-traffic areas as the sliding gesture does still take some time to fully open the door. In a store setting, it wouldn’t be practical, since shopping carts would mean that the shopper is too far from the sensor for gestures. Whatever the case may be, this is definitely a step in the right direction for a contactless future.

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By bringing tactility back to the otherwise non-tactile experience of a contactless interaction, Kinetic Touchless capitalizes on both the flexibility of contactless interactions and familiarity of contact interaction. In relooking how we interact with touchless technology, we can find new yet familiar experiences in a world where touch is simultaneously craved and feared’,” said the company.